EECS Welcomes Five New Faculty Members in Fiscal Year 2020

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September 4, 2020

Top row, L to R: Oliver, Corrigan-Gibbs, Chen. Bottom row, L to R: Yan, Ragan-Kelley

 

2020 has seen the addition of many new faculty members, including five recent hires within EECS. Learn more about their fascinating research below.

 

Yufeng (Kevin) Chen joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in January 2020. He received his Ph.D. in engineering science from Harvard University and his B.S. in applied physics from Cornell. He did postdoctoral research at Harvard University, leading to the development of small robots that are highly agile, multifunctional, and robust. His work has appeared in top journals including Science Robotics, Nature, and Nature Communications, among others. He has been a Forbes 30 Under 30 fellow. He investigates millimeter-scaled biomechanics, distilling the underlying physical principles, and then applies these findings to enable novel functions in microrobots. He is also interested in developing novel soft actuators to enable agile and robust locomotion in microrobots.

 

Henry Corrigan-Gibbs joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in July 2020. He received a Pd.D. and an M.S. in computer science from Stanford University and a BS in computer science from Yale University. His research interests are in computer security, cryptography, systems, and privacy. He has received the Eurocrypt Best Young Researcher Paper Award, the Caspar Bowden Award for Outstanding Research in Privacy-Enhancing Technologies, an IEEE Security and Privacy Distinguished Paper Award, a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, and an NSF Fellowship. Currently, he is a postdoc at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland. Previously he was an intern at Microsoft Research and the New York Times Interactive News Group, and he has also worked on computer-science projects in Ghana, Nepal, and Uganda.   

 

William Oliver is a newly tenured associate professor working with the Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group at Lincoln Laboratory and the Engineering Quantum Systems Group at MIT, where he provides programmatic and technical leadership for programs related to the development of quantum and classical high-performance computing technologies for quantum information science applications. His interests include the materials growth, fabrication, design, and control of superconducting quantum processors, as well as the development of cryogenic packaging and control electronics involving cryogenic CMOS and single-flux quantum digital logic. He is director of the Center for Quantum Engineering and associate director of the Research Laboratory of Electronics.

 

Jonathan Ragan-Kelley joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in January 2020. He received a Ph.D. and an S.M. in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT, and a B.S. in computer science from Stanford University. His research focuses on computer graphics, compilers, domain-specific languages, and high-performance systems. Among other honors, he has received research highlights in the Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery (CACM) journal, an Intel Foundation Pd.D. Fellowship, an NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship, an NSF Fellowship, and MIT’s William A. Martin Award for Best Master’s Thesis in Computer Science. Currently, he is an assistant professor at the University of California at Berkeley and has taught at Stanford and MIT. He was a postdoc at Stanford, and has been a researcher, intern, or consultant for Google, Adobe, and Intel, among others.

 

Mengjia Yan joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in November 2019. She received a Pd.D. and an M.S. in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a BS in computer science from Zhejiang University in China. Her research interests are in computer architecture, focusing on hardware support for security. Among other honors, she was a selected participant for Rising Stars in EECS at MIT and for Rising Stars in Computer Architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2018. At UIUC, she was a Mavis Future Faculty Fellow, a distinction awarded to students planning careers as engineering professors, and she received the W.J. Poppelbaum Memorial Award for architecture design creativity. She also served as a research intern for the NVIDIA Architecture Research Group.