Prospective Students' FAQs

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What is Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)?

What is special about EECS at MIT?

What undergraduate majors are offered in EECS?

What can I do with an EECS degree?

What's academic life like at EECS?

Who teaches EECS courses?

How do I get admitted to MIT?

Can I transfer into EECS from another university?

Can I tour the department?

How can I shadow a student and stay overnight?

How do I major in EECS at MIT?

Can I double-major?

What opportunities exist for EECS students to put their classwork into practice?

Whom may I contact for more information?  


What is Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)?

Electrical engineering and computer science are the engines for success in today's high-tech world, driving innovation in a broad range of fields from chip manufacturing and design to fiber optics, image processing, and systems engineering.

EECS students learn to:

  • design complex systems
  • model and control physical systems
  • augment physical systems with computation
  • build systems that are robust to uncertainty
  • communicate using signals, systems, and networks
  • evaluate tradeoffs in complex systems

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What is special about EECS at MIT?

Consistently ranked among the top electrical engineering and computer science programs in the world, EECS at MIT offers a flexible curriculum designed to allow students to explore their own interests in increasing depth. The curriculum is intensive and hands-on, with an emphasis on theory that distinguishes MIT from most schools. The Institute produces engineers who are capable of applying knowledge over a broad range of problems and creating rapid advances in technology. Also known as Course VI, EECS is the largest department at MIT with 700 undergraduates, 700 graduate students, and more than 120 faculty members. The department offers an M.Eng. program and a world-renowned doctoral program. 

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What undergraduate majors are offered in EECS?

EECS offers four undergraduate majors: electrical engineering, computer science, a combination of the two, and an interdepartmental major in computer science and molecular biology.

  • Electrical Engineering at MIT is a very broad program that starts with basic circuit theory and moves into systems, physics of electronic devices, and quantum mechanics.
  • Computer Science majors concentrate on how to make computers faster, more efficient, and more intelligent. Students begin by learning to deal with complexity through modeling and abstraction, and proceed to study computer system design and artificial intelligence.<
  • Computer Science and Molecular Biology combines study in molecular biology and computer science. Students learn to leverage computational biology for careers in such fields as pharmaceuticals, bioinformatics, and medicine.

All EECS students study advanced mathematics, including probability theory, and complex variable calculus. For more information, visit Undergraduate Programs. 

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What can I do with an EECS degree?

EECS graduates design video games, work on supercomputers and robots, conduct research into artificial intelligence, and launch start-up software companies. Some join large companies like Google, Microsoft, Oracle, or IBM; others work in research laboratories or get advanced degrees in other fields, including medicine and law. Many take jobs in financial services. MIT graduates are in very high demand. Starting salaries for students with bachelor's degrees average above $75,000.

Our graduates have the ability to perform a wide range of jobs because the breadth of their studies allows them to learn quickly the variety of languages and machines used in industry. The depth of study here gives students a fundamental understanding of problems and how to solve them.

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What's academic life like at EECS?

Studying in Course VI at MIT takes a lot of work, even for the absolutely brilliant. Classes are typically large, ranging from 125 to 200 for basic subjects, down to perhaps 20 in some labs. Typical class structure is two lectures per week and two smaller faculty-taught recitations (with 25-30 students). Beginning subjects have optional tutorials, where five or six students meet for an hour with a graduate teaching assistant.

While the department is large, faculty members are committed to providing a first-rate undergraduate education. Students will find that assistance is always available to those who make the effort to seek help. For more information, read about our Curriculum. 

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Who teaches EECS courses?

All our subjects have faculty instructors. The department's faculty includes many renowned researchers and scholars, including more than 40 members of the National Academy of Engineering, more than 10 members of the National Academy of Sciences, several National Medal of Technology winners, as well as many Fellows of professional societies, such as the IEEE, ACM, APS, AAAI, and others.

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How do I get admitted to MIT?

MIT Admissions can tell you everything you need to know about undergraduate admissions at MIT. Departments do not participate in undergraduate admissions and do NOT make specific recommendations to the Admissions Officers. There are no departmental entrance requirements for admitted MIT freshmen.

Those interested in graduate study at EECS should visit the MIT EECS Graduate Program. 

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Can I transfer into EECS from another university?

Prospective transfer students must apply through MIT Admissions. Only a handful of students are accepted each year from other colleges and universities, so admission is extremely selective. It can also be hard for transfer students to adjust to MIT; most end up spending extra time here to finish. The easiest time to get into MIT is as a freshman. 

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Can I tour the department?

If you would like to arrange a tour of our department's facilities during your campus visit, please contact the Course VI Undergraduate Office a few days in advance by emailing Anne M. Hunter (anneh@mit.edu) or Vera Sayzew (vera@mit.edu).

For tours of MIT, please contact the MIT Admissions Office.

How can I shadow a student and stay overnight?

For information on shadowing a student or staying on campus overnight, please visit the MIT Admissions Office. 

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How do I major in EECS at MIT?

MIT freshmen enter undeclared and typically choose a major at the end of their second semester. There are no prerequisites to declaring a major, but students who expect to join EECS may wish to get started on the department’s two required courses--6.01 Introduction to EECS I and 6.02 Introduction to EECS II--during freshman year.

More information about choosing a major is available from the Office of Undergraduate Advising and Programming. 

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Can I double-major?

Yes. Perhaps 25% of MIT students choose to major in two departments. It is also possible to minor in one or two of 45 fields, including subjects in the School of Science, the School of Engineering, and the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. (EECS does not offer any minor programs.) Popular major combinations include electrical engineering with physics and computer science with math or cognitive science. Economics, music, and management are common minors. The number of requirements increases with each major and minor, so it is important to know your limits. 

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What opportunities exist for EECS students to put their classwork into practice?

EECS students conduct research, gain practical experience in industry, and travel for work and study. They take jobs as lab assistants, spend junior year abroad, and intern at multinational companies. For more detailed information, visitEECS Opportunities.

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Whom may I contact for more information?

Undergraduates may address EECS questions to:

Anne M. Hunter
Administrator, EECS Undergraduate Office
MIT Room 38-476
Cambridge, MA 02139
617-253-4654
anneh@mit.edu

Vera Sayzew
Co-Administrator, EECS Undergraduate Office
MIT Room 38-476
Cambridge, MA 02139
617-452-3183
vera@mit.edu

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