EECS Advanced Undergraduate Research Program ('Super' UROP)

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In Fall 2012 the EECS Department launched a new advanced undergraduate research program for juniors and seniors who want to have a graduate level research experience working closely with a faculty advisor and producing publication worthy results. The new program called the “SuperUROP was developed in Spring of 2012 and at the end of its first year graduated 77 SuperUROP students. SuperUROP helps prepare students to continue in graduate school, enter industry or even be involved with startups. 

Visit the Super UROP website to learn about the 116 projects proposed by EECS faculty members and industry projects for SuperUROPs in the 2013-14 year. Some of these projects are listed in the cards on this page.  The site also contains information about application and registration.  (MIT certificates required).

EECS Projects

Industry Projects

Overview from Prof. Chandrakasan

SuperUROP 2012-13 brochure


Read more:

Oct. 17, 2013 MIT News Office article by Patricia Sampson and Danielle R. Festino: "SuperUROP raises bar for bar for undergraduate research and innovation."

Aug 21, 2013 Technology Review article by SuperUROP 2012-13 Denzil Sikka '13: "A Souped Up UROP. My year of advanced undergrad research."

May 13, 2013 MIT News Office article by Jennifer Chu titled: "First ‘SuperUROPs’ cap off inaugural year. EECS program immerses undergraduates in advanced research projects."

Jan. 23, 2013 MIT News Office article by Lauren Clark titled: "SuperUROP propels undergraduate research to next level. Poster session showcases student advances in key technologies and attracts faculty, venture capitalists and industry sponsors."

Nov. 2, 2012 MIT News Office article from EECS titled: "EECS celebrates the launch of SuperUROP."

May 8, 2012 MIT Tech article by Deborah Chen titled: "Course 6 develops new 'Super' UROPs. Students can commit to year-long research project & earn certificate." 

 


The program is illustrated in the diagram below.
 

Super UROP flow schematic illustrating choices and credits

A Souped-up UROP. Denzil Sikka writes about her SuperUROP
SuperUROP student (2012-13) Denzil Sikka '13, writes about her experience as a SuperUROP in the first year of the program. Read more in the Technology Review Aug. 21, 2013 article.
A development environment for mobile apps, education, and entrepreneurship
Faculty Advisor: Prof. Hal Abelson Mentor(s): Contact e-mail: hal@mit.edu Research Area(s): Computer Systems The goal of this project is to build and test an integrated development environment where undergraduates can generate ideas for mobile applications, build prototypes, and refine these to the point where they could be the basis for launching new ventures.
Polymer photonics for biochemical sensing applications
Faculty Advisor: Dirk Englund Mentor(s): Hannah Clevenson Contact e-mail: hannahac@mit.edu Research Area(s): Applied Physics, BioEECS, Energy, Materials and Devices, Nanotechnology, Theoretical Computer Science Prerequisites: Strong CAD skills, E&M, Optics, chemistry/biology background Sensing volatile gases and alcoholic vapors is very important in a variety of fields, from law enforcement and national security to industrial and environmental safety.
Modeling and Identification of Multi-Agent Systems with Applications to Smart Grids
Faculty Advisor: Prof Munther Dahleh and Dr. Mardavij Roozbehani Mentor(s): Contact e-mail: mardavij@mit.edu Research Area(s): Control, Energy, Signals and Systems, Theoretical Computer Science Understanding how smart appliances or electric vehicles respond to price signals is fundamental for stability and performance of future smart grids.
From Mockup to Web App: Building the Next-Generation Web Template Language
Faculty Advisor: David Karger Mentor(s): Ted Benson Contact e-mail: karger@mit.edu Research Area(s): Graphics and Human-Computer Interfaces Think web frameworks like Node and Backbone are cool? Then help us develop the future of web templates.
Solar cells with exciton fission
Faculty Advisor: Marc Baldo Mentor(s): Nick Thompson Contact e-mail: baldo@mit.edu, nthomp@mit.edu Research Area(s): Applied Physics, Energy, Materials and Devices, Nanotechnology An exciton is an excited state of a molecule. They are important in some solar cells because they mediate the conversion of light into charge.
Fantasy Football
Faculty Advisor: Anantha Chandrakasan and Anette (Peko) Hosoi Mentor(s): Contact e-mail: anantha@mtl.mit.edu and peko@mit.edu Research Area(s): The recent rise and success of analytic strategies in baseball management (popularized by Moneyball and other titles) prompts the question: Can similar strategies be applied to other sports?
Compiler Design for Automated Software Analysis Based on Optimization of Lyapunov Invariants
Faculty Advisor: Mardavij Roozbehani Mentor(s): Contact e-mail: mardavij@mit.edu Research Area(s): Computer Systems, Control, Theoretical Computer Science The goal of this project is to automate the process of software verification (i.e., proving that a given computer program does not produce run-time errors) for a limited class of software.
Printable Robots
Faculty Advisor: Daniela Rus Mentor(s): Contact e-mail: rus@csail.mit.edu Research Area(s): Artificial Intelligence, Circuits, Communications, Computer Systems, Control, Materials and Devices The goal of this project is to build a variety of flexible robotic systems from scratch using planar fabrication techniques.
Importing Machine Learning Techniques to the Database
Faculty Advisor: Una-May O'Reilly Mentor(s): Kalyan Veeramachaneni, Erik Hemberg Contact e-mail: alfa-apply@csail.mit.edu Research Area(s): Artificial Intelligence, Computer Systems Large and continuously growing data repositories require machine learning methods that are able to quickly mine and update their models.
Interactive Data Visualization for Everyone on the Web
Faculty Advisor: David Karger Mentor(s): Contact e-mail: karger@mit.edu Research Area(s): Graphics and Human-Computer Interfaces Exhibit (Link is an open source Javascript library that helps non-programmers author and publish rich interactive data visualizations on the web.
Development of Graphene-based RF Energy Harvesters on Paper
Faculty Advisor: Tomas Palacios Mentor(s): Lili Yu Contact e-mail: tpalacios@mit.edu Research Area(s): Materials and Devices In this project, we will use graphene and other two-dimensional materials to demonstrate RF energy harvesting devices on a flexible substrate such as PEN or paper.
Automated Diary Systems
Faculty Advisor: Daniela Rus Mentor(s): Contact e-mail: rus@csail.mit.edu Research Area(s): Artificial Intelligence, Computer Systems, Graphics and Human-Computer Interfaces Imagine an automatic private diary that records your life.