I - Applied Physics and Devices

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  • Calling it a glimpse into the future, technology news website CRN has hailed MIT EECS/CSAIL faculty and the new Wireless@MIT center as the source for seven new technologies that will impact (favorably) our daily lives. Read more...
  • Read the story about the quest for energy storage and a new company that has arisen in this process. Developed in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, a new breed of ultracpacitors that can store twice as much energy and deliver 10 times as much power as conventional capacitors is now being produced for commercial use.
  • As reported by the Champalimaud Foundation, the 2012 António Champalimaud Vision Award was given to several researchers including Professor James G. Fujimoto, Research Laboratory of Electronics affiliate Eric A. Swanson for the creation and development of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Fujimoto, the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering, Swanson, and their collaborators were recognized for the major role that OCT now plays in the diagnosis and treatment of the most important blinding diseases of the industrialized world: macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Currently, it is estimated that more than 40 million OCT diagnostic procedures are performed worldwide annually.
  • Jesus del Alamo, Donner Professor, MacVicar Faculty Fellow and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the EECS Department at MIT received the Semiconductor Research Corporation 2012 Technical Excellence Award in recognition for the fabrication of nanometer-scale transistors with world-record high frequency operation, as well as the investigation of the use of III-V compound semiconductors to enable a new generation of deeply scaled transistors for future digital applications.
  • EECS professor and MTL core faculty member Dana Weinstein is the recipient of an Intel Early Career Faculty Honor from the Intel Corporation. The announcement was made official this week.
  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!
  • Molybdenum-Disulfide (MoS2), like Graphene, is a one-molecule-thick material. But, MIT researchers including EECS Professors Tomas Palacios and Jing Kong have been able to produce complex electronic circuits from MoS2, a material that could have many more applications than graphene. This work is now reported in the journal Nano Letters.
  • Anantha P. Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head and the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT has been selected as the winner of the 2013 IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits. The citation for the award reads "For pioneering techniques in low-power digital and analog CMOS design."
  • Qing Hu, professor of electrical engineering and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has been awarded the IEEE Photonics Society's 2012 William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award. Qing is cited "for pioneering contribution in the development of high-temperature, high-power, and broadly tunable THz QCLs, and applications in imaging and sensing.”

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