I - Applied Physics and Devices

SHARE:
  • Marc Baldo, MIT professor of electrical engineering has teamed with MIT’s Troy Van Voorhis, professor of chemistry and other researchers to understand the theory behind singlet excitonic fission -- a process by which extra electrons are produced by incoming photonic energy -- first observed in the 1960s. This new understanding of what materials will generate this added energy has potential for creating solar cells that demonstratew up to 25 per cent increased efficiency. Read more.
  • An MIT team whose integrated chip restores lost power to partially shaded solar panels — achieving double the energy capture improvement of similar technologies — won big on Monday night at the seventh annual MIT Clean Energy Prize (CEP) competition. Five of the six members of Unified Solar, the winning team, in this high profile competition, are graduate students in the laboratory of EECS Professor Steeve Leeb. Read more.
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and head of the Analog Circuits and Biological Systems Group in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) is featured by the Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) at MIT for his work that blends both biological (wet) and electronic analog circuits (dry) in research that could lead to newly engineered immune cells that could detect cancer cells and kill them, for example. Read more.
  • Prof. Steven B. Leeb met with Sharon Burke, assistant secretary of Defense for Operational Energy Plans and Programs, about the non-intrusive load monitor developed at MIT, during Burke's visit to the Army Base Camp Integration Laboratory at Fort Devens, Mass. The monitor can look at an energy grid and break down energy use by individual devices plugged into a system. Read more.
  • Until now the theoretical and much studied quasiparticle known as the exciton — responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits — has never been observed in action. Now researchers in the Center for EXcitonics in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT including EECS professors Marc Baldo and Vladimir Bulovic, and investigators at the City College of New York have imaged excitons' motions directly. Read more.
  • Prof. Henry I. Smith, Emeritus Professor of Electrical Engineering and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT, was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) at the Academy’s 3rd annual conference on March 7, 2014. Prof. Smith was cited “For innovative contributions to micro and nanofabrication technology and applications.”
  • Researchers at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory (MTL) including Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering, recent EECS PhD graduate Marcus Yip, EECS graduate student Rui Jin and research scientist Nathan Ickes, together with physicians from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI), have developed a new, low-power signal-processing chip that could lead to a cochlear implant that requires no external hardware. The implant would be wirelessly recharged -- taking just two minutes -- and would run for about eight hours on each charge. Read more.
  • The Spanish Royal Academy of Engineering presented the "Agustin de Betancourt" award to Professor Tomás Palacios on Nov. 26. This award, the most prestigious given in Spain to an engineer less than 36 years old, recognizes Prof. Palacios’ work on nanotechnologies applied to high frequency electronic devices based on GaN and graphene.

Pages

Subscribe to I - Applied Physics and Devices