In the Media

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  • January 25, 2013
    With the fall 2012 launch of the bigdata@csail center, which represents a focused effort to understand and put to good use the huge amounts of data generated all the time, a handful of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are contributing specifically to medical applications. The MIT News Office has featured the work of Peter Szolovits, John Guttag, Alan Willsky and -- perhaps at the heart of abstractly looking at big data and medicine -- former EECS undergraduate and masters degree student David Rashef, now an MD/PhD student with the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology (HST) program. Read more...
  • December 14, 2012
    In an effort to bring a more human dimension to the online education experience, MIT Professor Rob Miller and EECS graduate students Mason Tang and Elena Tatarchenko have developed a new computer system that will help provide students with feedback on their homework assignments and create more interaction between students, teachers, and alumni.
  • November 13, 2012
    In the effort to handle data overload, Daniela Rus, professor of computer science MIT and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with postdoctoral associate Daniel Feldman to describe a novel way to represent data so that it takes up much less space in memory but can still be processed in conventional ways when needed.
  • November 13, 2012
    Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston, who earned his undergraduate degree in computer science at MIT in 2005 and teamed with then EECS undergraduate student Arash Ferdowsi to found the company, will be the MIT June 7, 2013 Commencement speaker. "I’ve had some of the most formative experiences of my life at MIT,” Houston says. “It’s where Dropbox started and where I met my co-founder, Arash, so it’s an honor to come back and share my story. Technology is at the heart of how we shape our future and confront our challenges, and more than ever the world needs MIT graduates to lead us forward.”
  • November 9, 2012
    Hal Abelson, the Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at MIT and principal investigator at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and computer science student Kang Zhang have developed a crowd sourcing system that has analyzed the tweets of roughly 10 million U.S. voters as the national election came and went. Read more...
  • November 7, 2012
    In celebration of its 40th anniversary, the EE Times is recognizing the innovators who made the electronics industry what it is today and particularly the visionaries who are creating new paths. Several members of the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department are among the ten visionaries selected including Rodney Brooks and Wireless@MIT. Read more.
  • November 1, 2012
    At the Interdisciplinary Workshop on Information and Decision in Social Networks at MIT on November 8-9, Associate Professor Devavrat Shah and his student Stanislav Nikolov, will present a new algorithm that can, with 95 percent accuracy, predict which topics will trend an average of an hour and a half before Twitter’s algorithm puts them on the list — and sometimes as much as four or five hours before. Read more...
  • October 31, 2012
    CSAIL researchers and members of the Clinical Decision Making Group including the group's director Peter Szolovits, professor of computer science and engineering and postdoctoral researcher Anna Rumshisky have developed a new system for disambiguating (distinguishing between several meanings) the senses of words used in doctors’ clinical notes. Read more...
  • October 17, 2012
    Calling it a glimpse into the future, technology news website CRN has hailed MIT EECS/CSAIL faculty and the new Wireless@MIT center as the source for seven new technologies that will impact (favorably) our daily lives. Read more...
  • August 31, 2012
    Members of the MIT Database Group including Sam Madden, an associate professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and co-leader of the 'bigdata@CSAIL' initiative, EECS graduate student Alvin Cheung, and researchers from Cornell University are presenting work this week at the 38th International Conference on Very Large Databases on Pyxis - a new system that automatically streamlines websites’ database access patterns, making the sites up to three times as fast while allowing the types of languages already favored by Web developers.
  • August 24, 2012
    CSAIL/EECS researchers including EECS graduate students Adam Marcus and Eugene Wu and EECS professors Sam Madden, Rob Miller and David Karger, have developed a way for users of crowdsourcing database operations to avoid computational details in the process while cost effectiveness is significantly improved. The new system called Qurk will automatically crowdsource tasks that are difficult or impossible to perform computationally.
  • July 11, 2012
    Professor of applied math and computer science at MIT and head of the Computation and Biology Group, Bonnie Berger, with former and current students, has developed an algorithm that allows researchers to access huge amounts of data in geneome databases despite the rate of genome sequencing that threatens to outpace researchers' ability to analyze the added data.
  • June 28, 2012
    Prof. Hari Balakrishnan and graduate student Keith Winstein have developed an alternative to SSH - a remote log-in program called Mosh for mobile shell - finally allowing for the mobile Internet. They reported their work at the Usenix Annual Technical Conference in Boston this month.
  • May 31, 2012
    At a major Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence event held May 31, 2012 at the MIT Stata Center, a new CSAIL initiative known as "bigdata@CSAIL" was announced by MIT president Susan Hockfield as Intel’s CTO, Justin Rattner announced that MIT would house a new Intel research center to focus on techniques for the science and engineering of big data -- the huge amounts of information generated by Web users and networked sensors. In addition, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick announced the Massachusetts Big Data Initiative to investigate how big-data technologies can improve government.
  • May 29, 2012
    Indyk/Katabi's sparse Fourier transform (SFT) has been named to MIT Technology Review’s 2012 list of the world’s 10 most important emerging technologies.