Research

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  • Institute professor Mildred Dresselhaus has teamed with fellow researchers in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and from MIT's Physics Department and Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) to identify a promising light source for optoelectronic chips that can be tuned to different frequencies — crucial to realizing the full potential of moving data with far greater energy efficiency. Read more.
  • Li-Shiuan Peh, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the EECS Department at MIT has teamed to develop a new system that directs drivers using GPS to avoid traffic congestion. The work won the group one of the best-paper awards at the Intelligent Transportation Systems World Congress last week. Read more.
  • Dirk Englund, assistant professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT and head of the Quantum Photonics Group, collaborates with the experts and instruments at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials to explore the quantum landscape. Read more
  • Dimitri Antoniadis was presented the 2014 Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) Aristotle Award at the annual SRC TECHCON conference on Sept. 8 in Austin, Texas. He Is cited by the SRC for outstanding teaching and a deep commitment to the educational experience of his graduate students and for pioneering research in nanoscale solid-state electronic devices involving the application of new materials systems and structures to transistors for deeply scaled electronics. Read more.
  • Principal investigator in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab Charles E. Leiserson is the recipient of the ACM/IEEE Computer Society 2014 Ken Kennedy Award, in recognition of his important impact on parallel computing systems. Read more.
  • Cited for her work as doctor, engineer and scientist to design nano and micro technologies that pioneer new ways to understand and fight disease, Sangeeta N. Bhatia, the John J. (1929) and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) has been awarded the Lemelson-MIT Prize. Read more.
  • A research team from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology including Jongyoon Han, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, has developed a new way to diagnose malaria using magnetic resonance relaxometry (MRR) — a technology that the group is adapting for inexpensive field deployable usage. Read more.
  • Professor Ruonan Han joined the EECS department at MIT as an assistant professor in July 2014. As a principal investigator with the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL), Han will pursue work in ultra-high-speed circuits and systems. His research group, the Terahertz Integrated Electronics Group aims to explore microelectronic technologies to bridge the terahertz gap between microwave and infrared domains. Read more.
  • Getting to the source of data-visualization aberrations is a big problem in big data. EECS doctoral student Eugene Wu with Sam Madden, professor of computer science and engineering in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have released a new tool, called DBWipes, that pinpoints aberrations and determines which data sources to investigate. Read more.
  • A team led by Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) researchers including EECS associate professor Wojciech Matusik and project lead and doctoral candidate Adriana Schulz has developed “Fab By Example,” the first data-driven method to help people design products, with a growing database of templates that allow users to customize thousands of complex items — without the need to understand the mechanical engineering that might normally be expected. The team will be presenting its system at this month’s Siggraph graphics conference. Read more.
  • Researchers at MIT -- including EECS graduate student Abe Davis and EECS faculty members Fredo Durand and Bill Freeman, and members of the Computer Graphics Group in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have collaborated with colleagues at Microsoft and Adobe to develop an algorithm to reconstruct an audio signal produced by practically invisible vibrations of objects filmed in video and normally inaudible to human hearing. Read more.
  • Paying attention to the data that says MOOC learning is limited because of high drop rates and other negatives, CSAIL researchers have noted that students need help learning how to watch the videos and these researchers have developed a new way for students to learn how to watch MOOC videos called LectureScape. Read more.
  • EECS faculty members Hari Balakrishnan and Devavrat Shah with EECS graduate students Jonathan Perry, and Amy Ousterhout, and Hans Fugal of Facebook have devised a new system to reduce delay time in data center queues. Using Fastpass, the name given to the new system, the group has experimentally reduced the average queue length of routers by as much as 99.6 percent in a Facebook data center. Read more.
  • Light is everything to good photography. Knowing this fact well, EECS professor Fredo Durand, also an experienced photographer, has begun to create a new system that uses drones (light-equipped autonomous robots) to create accurate lighting while communicating with the camera-mounted interface. Durand and several other researchers will report on their work at an upcoming international symposium in August.
  • Professor Qing Hu and graduate students in his research group, the Millimeter-wave and Terahertz Devices Group in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and researchers from several outside research labs have published their breakthrough research on terahertz laser frequency combs, and are featured as the cover story of the June 2014 issue of Nature Photonics (June 2014, Volume 8 No 6). This research has applications from cancer detection to explosives sensing. Read more about this research on the RLE website.
  • Three EECS faculty members were recently the recipients of major awards. Dimitri Bertsekas received the 2014 American Automatic Control Council Richard Bellman Heritage Award, Rodney Brooks received the 2014 Engelberger Robotics Award for Leadership and the 2015 IEEE Robotics and Automation Award, and Sanjoy Mitter received the 2015 IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. Read more.
  • The potential for multicore computing on a chip has gained new traction with the work by MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department faculty member Li-Shiuan Peh and EECS graduate student Bhavya Daya as they present a new 36-core chip on which each core acts as a mini Internet using a router to complete a communication network for data transport, while keeping local data up to date. Read more.
  • Bernard Haeupler, PhD '13, has been selected by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) as recipient of the 2014 Doctoral Dissertation Award in Distributed Computing. Dr. Haeupler completed his thesis “Probabilistic Methods for Distributed Information Dissemination” in June 2013 under the co-supervision of Professors Jonathan Kelner, Muriel Médard, and David Karger at MIT.
  • At the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition this month, EECS faculty member and associate department head William Freeman and colleagues from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) will present a new algorithm that can, with roughly 80 percent accuracy, determine whether a given snippet of video is playing backward or forward. Read more.
  • Working with members of the Quantum Photonics Laboratory (QPL) under the direction of EECS assistant professor Dirk Englund, principal author Hannah Clevenson, EECS graduate student and Pierre Desjardins and Xuetao Gan have developed an optical gas sensor that provides an extremely sensitive and compact way to detect very small amounts of target molecules of gas before they disperse. Read more.
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, was interviewed recently by Jeremey Hobson on Boston NPR radio station WBUR's noon news program "Here and Now" about her work creating miniature livers for testing drugs. Listen to the podcast.
  • EECS faculty members Dina Katabi, director of the Wireless Center at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and CSAIL colleague Robert Miller with EECS graduate students Fadel Adib and Zach Kabalec have collaborated to develop wireless technology to track a person's vital signals such as breathing (heart rate) and more from another room with no need for intrusive wearable technologies. Read more.
  • EECS faculty member, Robert Berwick, principal investigator in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) has teamed with MIT Linguistics and Philosophy professor Shigeru Miyagawa to reinforce the thesis that human language development is based on bird song and other primates communication. Read more.
  • MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) held a two day conference celebrating 50 years of computer science looking forward to the future with solutions for today's obstacles and tomorrow's solutions. Read more.