Nanotechnology & Quantum Information Processing

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  • In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.
  • Jesús del Alamo, the Donner Professor, MacVicar Faculty Fellow and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT is the recipient of the 2012 Electron Devices Society (EDS) Education Award. On receiving this award at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco on Dec. 10, 2012, Prof. del Alamo was cited by the EDS “for pioneering contributions to the development of online laboratories for microelectronics education on a worldwide scale.”
  • Judy Hoyt, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the MIT EECS Department, has teamed with colleagues in the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) to design a new kind of p-type transistor using germanium (not silicon). The team has successfully demonstrated that the p-type transistor can achieve speeds twice as fast as current experimental p-type transistors and nearly four times as fast as the best commercially produced p-type transistors.
  • EECS researchers including professors Vladimir Bulovic, Jing Kong and Mildred Dresselhaus and postdoctoral associate Hyesung Park and graduate student Joel Jean have joined MIT colleagues including associate professor of materials science and engineering Silvija Gradecak and postdoctoral associate Sehoon Chang, to produce a new kind of flexible and solar cell based on graphene paired with nanowires and quantum dots. This work could rival the current use of silicon crystals or indium tin oxide (ITO) and is predicted to be scalable for alternative use to the silicon or ITO models.
  • A team from the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) including Jesús del Alamo, the Donner Professor of Science in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), EECS graduate student Jianqian Lin, and Dimitri Antoniadis, the Ray and Maria Stata Professor of Electrical Engineering have used indium gallium arsenide to build nanometer-sized metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) that can outpace silicon providing the smallest non-silicon transistors yet.
  • Luis Velásquez-García, a principal research scientist at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratories, and his group have created a new system for spinning nanofibers—one that should offer significant productivity increases while drastically reducing power consumption. They will be presenting this work at the International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications in December.
  • EECS PhD candidate Faraz Najafi together with another student (Qingyuan Zhao, Visiting Graduate Student) won first place for the Best Student Poster at the Applied Superconductivity Conference that was held Oct. 7-12, 2012 in Portland, Oregon.
  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.
  • Calling it a glimpse into the future, technology news website CRN has hailed MIT EECS/CSAIL faculty and the new Wireless@MIT center as the source for seven new technologies that will impact (favorably) our daily lives. Read more...

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