I - Applied Physics and Devices

SHARE:
  • Researchers at MIT -- including EECS graduate student Abe Davis and EECS faculty members Fredo Durand and Bill Freeman, and members of the Computer Graphics Group in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have collaborated with colleagues at Microsoft and Adobe to develop an algorithm to reconstruct an audio signal produced by practically invisible vibrations of objects filmed in video and normally inaudible to human hearing. Read more.
  • Professor Qing Hu and graduate students in his research group, the Millimeter-wave and Terahertz Devices Group in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and researchers from several outside research labs have published their breakthrough research on terahertz laser frequency combs, and are featured as the cover story of the June 2014 issue of Nature Photonics (June 2014, Volume 8 No 6). This research has applications from cancer detection to explosives sensing. Read more about this research on the RLE website.
  • The potential for multicore computing on a chip has gained new traction with the work by MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department faculty member Li-Shiuan Peh and EECS graduate student Bhavya Daya as they present a new 36-core chip on which each core acts as a mini Internet using a router to complete a communication network for data transport, while keeping local data up to date. Read more.
  • Working with members of the Quantum Photonics Laboratory (QPL) under the direction of EECS assistant professor Dirk Englund, principal author Hannah Clevenson, EECS graduate student and Pierre Desjardins and Xuetao Gan have developed an optical gas sensor that provides an extremely sensitive and compact way to detect very small amounts of target molecules of gas before they disperse. Read more.
  • Vladimir Bulovic, the Fariborz Maseeh Professor of Emerging Technology and associate dean for innovation in MIT’s School of Engineering, with MIT professor of chemistry Moungi Bawendi and graduate students Chia-Hao Chuang and Patrick Brown have developed new quantum dot photovoltaic cells that demonstrate significant efficiency in solar cells with no need for high temperature or vacuum conditions to operate -- or to be produced. Read more.
  • Marc Baldo, MIT professor of electrical engineering has teamed with MIT’s Troy Van Voorhis, professor of chemistry and other researchers to understand the theory behind singlet excitonic fission -- a process by which extra electrons are produced by incoming photonic energy -- first observed in the 1960s. This new understanding of what materials will generate this added energy has potential for creating solar cells that demonstratew up to 25 per cent increased efficiency. Read more.
  • An MIT team whose integrated chip restores lost power to partially shaded solar panels — achieving double the energy capture improvement of similar technologies — won big on Monday night at the seventh annual MIT Clean Energy Prize (CEP) competition. Five of the six members of Unified Solar, the winning team, in this high profile competition, are graduate students in the laboratory of EECS Professor Steeve Leeb. Read more.
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and head of the Analog Circuits and Biological Systems Group in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) is featured by the Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) at MIT for his work that blends both biological (wet) and electronic analog circuits (dry) in research that could lead to newly engineered immune cells that could detect cancer cells and kill them, for example. Read more.

Pages

Subscribe to I - Applied Physics and Devices