Research

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  • Jeffrey Shapiro, the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering working with members of the Optical and Quantum Communications Group of which he is a co-director in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT has demonstrated experimentally the effectiveness of a new quantum communication protocol. The group has shown in a series of papers the system's effectiveness in both security (against passive eavesdropping) and can be used for greater distances than the current quantum key distribution (QKD).
  • CNN recently interviewed Tomas Palacios, Director of the MIT/MTL Center forf Grahene Devices and 2D Systems. Palacios, the Emmanuel E. Landsman Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, described graphene's unique properties enabling it to conduct electric currents faster than in any other known material. He also provides a view of the potential for graphene's use in the future.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science faculty members and principal investigators in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) Tim Lu and Rahul Sarpeshkar have designed cells that exploit natural integral biochemical functions to make analog circuits to perform calculations and potentially act as pathogen sensors. The researchers, including lead author MIT postdoc Ramiz Daniel and microbiology graduate student Jacob Rubens have published their work in the May 15 online edition of Nature Biotechnology.
  • Dana Weinstein, the Steven G. ('68) and Renee Finn Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Laura Popa, a graduate student in physics at the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratory (MTL) have developed a new method for manufacturing hardware-based radio-signal filtration. Their work should improve filtration performance while enabling 14 times as many filters per chip.
  • The Executive Committee of the MIT Corporation recently approved awarding tenure to seven School of Engineering faculty members including, Scott J. Aaronson, Associate Professor, effective July 1, 2013. Aaronson, also a principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, CSAIL,... read more.
  • Kuang Xu, a graduate student in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science [photo, right], and his advisor, John Tsitsiklis, the Clarence J. Lebel Professor of Electrical Engineering, have demonstrated in a series of recent papers that a little versatility in operations management, cloud computing and even health-care delivery and manufacturing could save exponential reduction in delays.
  • EECS professor Muriel Medard, principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) has teamed with EECS graduate student Ulric Ferner and Bell Labs researcher Emina Sojanin to develop a new technique to cut down on wasteful storage practices, especially of video content, in large data centers. Their work has been reported in the April issue of Technology Review.
  • The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has announced that it is honoring Professor Piotr Indyk and Professor Dina Katabi for their innovations in computing technology. Indyk has been named one of the recipients of the Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award, which honors specific theoretical accomplishments that have had a significant and demonstrable effect on the practice of computing. Katabi has been honored as one of the recipients of the Grace Murray Hopper Award, which recognizes the outstanding young computer professionals of the year.
  • A new mechanism that could help explain the remarkable sensitivity and exquisite frequency selectivity of our sense of hearing has been discovered by Dennis Freeman, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) Principal Investigator in the Micromechanics Group, in collaboration with Dr. Roozbeh Ghaffari, post-doctoral associate in the RLE.
  • President Barack Obama met Thursday, March 28, in the Oval Office with the six U.S. recipients of the 2012 Kavli Prizes — including MIT’s Mildred S. Dresselhaus, Ann M. Graybiel and Jane X. Luu. Obama and his science and technology advisor, John P. Holdren, received the scientists to recognize their landmark contributions in nanoscience, neuroscience and astrophysics, respectively. Read more...
  • Collin Stultz, faculty member of both the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology and MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science has lead a recent study of one of the proteins associated with neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Using computational modeling, Stultz has proposed solutions to a controversy over the structure of alpha synuclein that could lead to development of new more effective treatments. Read more...
  • Professor Timothy K. Lu, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Biological Engineering at MIT is one of 16 young researchers selected by the Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR) as a Young Investigator. The ONR Young Investigator Prize (YIP) program is designed to attract young scientists and engineers who show exceptional promise for outstanding research and teaching careers. Read more...
  • Building tomorrow's robots that can handle changing environments and unknowns will require designing a system that constantly calculates these uncertainties. EECS professors and principal investigators with the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Leslie Kaelbling and Tomas Lozano Perez have recently submitted their work on this area of artificial intelligence for publication in the International Journal of Robotics Research.
  • Building an effective Photovoltaic cell (PV) that both collects enough solar energy and carries the charge efficiently has held back the use of quantum dots despite their relative ease of production. Read more.
  • Professor Peter Szolovits has been named the recipient of the 2013 Morris F. Collen Award of Excellence. The award is presented annually by the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) in honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field. According to the ACMI, the award is the "highest honor in informatics that is presented by the American College of Medical Informatics to an individual whose personal commitment and dedication to biomedical informatics has made a lasting impression on healthcare and biomedicine.”
  • Professor Russ Tedrake and members of his research group, the Robot Locomotion Group, have tackled a difficult problem in robotics: how to mathematically allow for all instances of robot limbs touching (or striking) another surface in conjunction with free space motions. Tedrake and members of his group will be presenting their work in April at the Hybrid Systems: Computation and Control conference. The paper titled "A Direct Method for Trajectory Optimization of Rigid Bodies Through Contact" has been short listed for the best paper category.
  • Researchers in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) working with a colleague at Georgia Tech have shown in a paper titled " Optimization of Lyapunov Invariants in Verification of Software Systems" in the latest issue of the journal IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, that principles from control theory can be applied to computer software to improve software verification.
  • The Royal Academy of Engineering has announced that Tim Berners-Lee, the 3COM Founders Professor of Engineering at MIT, has been named one of the winners of the inaugural Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering for his work in creating the World Wide Web. The award honored Berners-Lee, Marc Andreessen, Vinton Cerf, Robert Kahn and Louis Pouzin for "outstanding advances in engineering that have changed the world and benefited humanity.”
  • Professor Rob Miller is one of four MIT faculty selected as 2013 MacVicar Faculty Fellow for outstanding undergraduate teaching, mentoring and educational innovation. One recommender wrote: “I think Rob embodies the ideal of an MIT teacher — caring, engaging, tirelessly working on behalf of the students, eliciting respect, admiration, and joy from the students.”
  • MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali have won the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) A.M. Turing Award for their pioneering work in the fields of cryptography and complexity theory. Essentially laying the foundation for modern cryptography by formalizing the concept that cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute, the two have turned cryptography from an art into science -- and, in the process provided the basis for securing today's communications protocols, Internet transactions and cloud computing. They also made fundamental advances in the theory of computational complexity, an area that focuses on classifying computational problems according to their inherent difficulty.
  • Researchers working with EECS faculty member and CSAIL principal investigator Samuel Madden, are developing a new system called DBSeer to address the realities of cloud computing -- particularly database applications requiring over expenditure for hardware. In June, Professor Madden and members of the MIT Database Group including first author of two papers on this work, postdoctoral associate Barzan Mozafari will present their work at the annual meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Management of Data (SIGMOD).
  • Abstract: This talk will discuss high throughput nanomanufacturing enabled by inkjet based UV nanoimprint lithography with a focus on (i) Design and real-time control of nanopatterning systems; and (ii) Customized systems and processes for applications including CMOS memory, patterned media for hard disk drives, flexible nanoelectronics, and shape/size controlled nanocarriers for targeted diagnostics and drug delivery. Biography: S.V. Sreenivasan specializes in high throughput nanomanufacturing as applied to electronics, biomedicine, and energy. He is the John T. MacGuire professor of mechanical engineering at UT-Austin; and co-founder of Molecular Imprints, Inc., a world leader in imprint based nanolithography technology.
  • In a "fireside" chat forum, Wireless@MIT co-directors and professors in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, Dina Katabi and Hari Balakrishnan discussed spectrum and wireless policies with US Federal Communications Commission head Julius Genachowski at the Kirsch Auditorium in the Stata Center, Thursday, March 7, 2013.
  • Quantum Dots: From MIT to Market QD Vision spun out of MIT in 2005, with a broad technology suite, a business plan, and Series A funding from top-notch Boston-based venture capitalists. Despite several twists and turns of technology development and market evolution, QD Vision announced in January that our quantum dot-enabled Color IQTM components will be in 2013 Sony TVs, the first mainstream product launch of a QD device. This talk will describe the pathway, and pitfalls, to this milestone.
  • On Wednesday, March 6 at 4:00 PM, Julius Genachowski, Chairman of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will answer questions about wireless spectrum - including spectrum sharing, spectrum access and allocation, and the impact of the spectrum crunch on the wireless industry - during a Fireside Chat with Professor Hari Balakrishnan and Professor Dina Katabi, co-directors of the MIT Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Stata Center, Kirsch Auditorium, 32-123.