Research

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  • Jeffrey H. Shapiro has been elected to the grade of Fellow of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics. SPIE was founded in 1955 to advance light-based technologies. Shapiro, the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department is also a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the IEEE, the Institute of Physics, and the Optical Society of America. Read more.
  • Prof. Dina Katabi, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab at MIT working with members of her research group has developed a 3-D motion tracking system that has potential for gaming and far more. Read more in the CSAIL Dec. 12, 2013 article
  • Professor Piotr Indyk and members of his group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed an algorithm that betters his (and Prof. Dina Katabi's) work to develop a faster than fast Fourier Transform in 2012. The new algorithm that uses the minimum possible number of samples to analyze signals has the potential to allow advances in medical devices such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machines to scan patients.
  • Prof. Mildred Dresselhaus, Institute professor emerita and faculty member in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Physics Departments, received the Materials Research Society Von Hippel Award in recognition of her work and close association with Prof. Von Hippel. Read more.
  • Professor Alan Willsky, has been selected to receive the 2013 SPS Society Award of the IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS). Willsky is the Edwin Sibley Webster professor of electrical engineering and computer science and director of the MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) at MIT. Read more.
  • Professors Dina Katabi and Nir N. Shavit have been elected to 2013 Fellow by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM). As part of a select 1% of ACM membership, Fellows are recognized “for their contributions to computing that are driving innovations across multiple domains and disciplines - accelerating the digital revolution and impacting every dimension of how we live work and play.” Read more.
  • Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Principal Research Scientist Luis Velasquez-Garcia, with members of his research group has developed a new way to perform x-rays that not only includes soft tissue, but is streamlined to portable dimension cutting the dose and overall expense typical for current x-ray machines. The Velasquez-Garcia group is presenting their work at the 13th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2013), being held Dec. 3 to 6 in London. Read more
  • Under the direction of EECS professor Jeffrey Shapiro, and senior research scientist Franco Wong - both members of the Research Laboratory of Electronic's (RLE) Optical and Quantum Communications Group and of Vivek Goyal, RLE research scientist and head of the Signal Transformation and Information Representation Group, EECS doctoral student Ahmed Kirmani, working under Goyal, has developed a computational imager that uses one photon per pixel allowing laser rangefinders to infer depth (3D) from a hundredth as much light and produce images from one 900th the light needed. Read more.
  • Tuesday, November 26th, 2013, 34-101, @4:15pm. Refreshments @ 4:00pm.
  • "There's a very strong need for that computer to turn electrical signals into optical signals very efficiently," Dirk Englund the Jamieson Career Development Assistant Professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department explained to Marketplace Tech. Englund was approached to discuss his work in the Quantum Photonics Laboratory, where computer chips made of graphene and silicon are encouraging information to move near the speed of light. Read more.
  • Using artificial intelligence tools including probabilistic graphical models, Ying Liu, EECS graduate student working with Alan Willsky, EECS professor and director of the Laboratory for Information and Decisions Systems (LIDS) has developed a technique that can efficiently infer vital information about the propagation of flight delays at U.S. airports. Liu and Willsky will present their work, which has potential application to a wide range of areas, at the Neural Information Processing Systems Foundation in early December. Read more.
  • The Big Data Initiative at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) today announced two new activities aimed at improving the use and management of Big Data. The first is a series of data challenges designed to spur innovation in how people use data to solve problems and make decisions. Read more.
  • At this month’s IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transport Systems, Berthold Horn, professor of computer science and engineering in the EECS Department at MIT and member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), presented a new algorithm for alleviating traffic flow instabilities, which he believes could be implemented by a variation of the adaptive cruise-control systems that are an option on many of today’s high-end cars. Read more.
  • EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced today the appointment of Professor Daniela Rus as the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The Chair was established in 1999 by Andrew and Erna to recognize significant contributions in the field of communications and signal processing. Prof. Ronald Rivest was the first chair holder of the Viterbi Professorship. Read more.
  • EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced today the appointment of Ron Rivest as the new holder of the Vannevar Bush Professorship. The Bush Chair is an Institute-wide professorship established in 1982 as a memorial to one of the outstanding scientists and engineers of the twentieth century.
  • MIT EECS faculty members in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab CSAIL Frans Kaashoek, Nickolai Zeldovich and Armando Solar-Lezama along with EECS graduate student Xi Wang have created a system they call Stack which will automatically scan programmer's code to avoid compilers from tossing bits of code that might not appear essential. Read more.
  • Along with 9 other finalists, EECS graduate student Cody Gilleland presented his dream research proposal in April to Regeneron. He was named inaugural recipient, based on his presentation to essentially bring Moore's law to early stage drug delivery by designing a new system for developing and validating drug targets (prior to mouse model trials).
  • Self-assembling robots were dismissed even by Daniela Rus, professor of computer science and engineering and director of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), until she worked again with former MIT EECS senior John Romanishin, now a research scientist in CSAIL and the one who was convinced (since his undergraduate days) that it could be done. They will present their work on the new self-propelled robots at the IEEE RSJ International conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. Read more.
  • Dina Katabi, professor in the MIT EECS Department, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and co-director of Wireless@MIT has been selected as a 2013 MacArthur Fellow. She is cited by the MacArthur Fellows Program for her work "at the interface of computer science and electrical engineering to improve the speed, reliability, and security of data exchange. Katabi has contributed to a range of networking issues, from protocols to minimize congestion in high-bandwidth networks to algorithms for spectrum analysis, though most of her work centers on wireless data transmission."
  • Daniel Sanchez, assistant professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and his student Nathan Beckmann have developed a software alternative to manage high-speed on-chip memory (cache). Read more
  • EECS graduate students Alessandro Chiesa and Madars Virza have teamed to develop a new system which can detect tampering in the cloud. The team presented their system, which is described as a practical, succinct zero-knowledge proof for arbitrary programs, at the International Cryptology Conference in August. Read more
  • Timothy Lu, assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department with EECS graduate student Samuel Perli and Fahim Farzadfard, MIT Biology Department graduate student have developed a technique that can turn genes on or off inside yeast and human cells -- a potential window on understanding the function of those genes and also leading to engineering genes that could perform useful functions. Read more.
  • Detecting early-stage malarial infection of blood cells is a diagnostic that has recently come closer to reality through the work of MIT's Anantha Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head, and Subra Suresh, former MIT Dean of Engineering, now president of Carnegie Mellon University. The work, which has been published Aug. 8 in the journal Lab on a Chip, is potentially applicable to detecting other infections and diseases.
  • Muriel Médard, professor of electrical engineering in the MIT EECS Department and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and EECS graduate student Falvio du Pin Calmon have teamed with researchers at the National University of Ireland to demonstrate that the security of many keyless-entry systems may not be as secure as previously thought. Médard and the NUI team will present their work at the Asilomar Conference on Signals and Systems in September.
  • Rodney Brooks, iRobot co-founder and Chairman and CTO of Rethink Robotics, was recently featured in the MIT News Office — following the selection by Technology Review of Rethink Robotics as one of 50 Disruptive Companies 2013. Founded by Brooks in 2008, Rethink Robotics is stocking manufacturers with easily taught assembly-line capable robots that can work safely alongside humans.