Research

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  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandraksan has announced the appointment of Prof. Jeffrey H. Lang to the Vitesse Professorship in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, effective July 1, 2013. The Vitesse Chair was established in 2000 to honor the Vitesse Semiconductor Corporation, a company co-founded in 1984 by former MIT students.
  • Joel Voldman engineers cutting-edge approaches to stem cell signaling, point of care therapeutics, and neuroengineering. In the never-ending mega study of how biological systems work, Joel Voldman’s mission is to understand the most basic interactions between single cells. To achieve that, he applies the power of microfluidics to isolate the actions and behaviors of single cells and the interactions between cells.
  • Read about Tomas Palacios, the Emmanuel E. Landsman Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, where he is a principal investigator in the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) in the July 3, 2013 MIT News Office article by Larry Hardesty titled "High potential - Tomás Palacios investigates use of ‘extreme materials’ in electronics, which could reduce energy consumption and make computers far faster."
  • Jeffrey Shapiro, the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering working with members of the Optical and Quantum Communications Group of which he is a co-director in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT has demonstrated experimentally the effectiveness of a new quantum communication protocol. The group has shown in a series of papers the system's effectiveness in both security (against passive eavesdropping) and can be used for greater distances than the current quantum key distribution (QKD).
  • CNN recently interviewed Tomas Palacios, Director of the MIT/MTL Center forf Grahene Devices and 2D Systems. Palacios, the Emmanuel E. Landsman Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, described graphene's unique properties enabling it to conduct electric currents faster than in any other known material. He also provides a view of the potential for graphene's use in the future.
  • A new mechanism that could help explain the remarkable sensitivity and exquisite frequency selectivity of our sense of hearing has been discovered by Dennis Freeman, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) Principal Investigator in the Micromechanics Group, in collaboration with Dr. Roozbeh Ghaffari, post-doctoral associate in the RLE.
  • President Barack Obama met Thursday, March 28, in the Oval Office with the six U.S. recipients of the 2012 Kavli Prizes — including MIT’s Mildred S. Dresselhaus, Ann M. Graybiel and Jane X. Luu. Obama and his science and technology advisor, John P. Holdren, received the scientists to recognize their landmark contributions in nanoscience, neuroscience and astrophysics, respectively. Read more...
  • Building an effective Photovoltaic cell (PV) that both collects enough solar energy and carries the charge efficiently has held back the use of quantum dots despite their relative ease of production. Read more.
  • Two new faculty members were announced by EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan: Dirk Englund, who began as an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in January 2013 and Daniel Sanchez, who joined the EECS Department as Assistant Professor and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) in September 2013. Read more.
  • Abstract: This talk will discuss high throughput nanomanufacturing enabled by inkjet based UV nanoimprint lithography with a focus on (i) Design and real-time control of nanopatterning systems; and (ii) Customized systems and processes for applications including CMOS memory, patterned media for hard disk drives, flexible nanoelectronics, and shape/size controlled nanocarriers for targeted diagnostics and drug delivery. Biography: S.V. Sreenivasan specializes in high throughput nanomanufacturing as applied to electronics, biomedicine, and energy. He is the John T. MacGuire professor of mechanical engineering at UT-Austin; and co-founder of Molecular Imprints, Inc., a world leader in imprint based nanolithography technology.
  • Quantum Dots: From MIT to Market QD Vision spun out of MIT in 2005, with a broad technology suite, a business plan, and Series A funding from top-notch Boston-based venture capitalists. Despite several twists and turns of technology development and market evolution, QD Vision announced in January that our quantum dot-enabled Color IQTM components will be in 2013 Sony TVs, the first mainstream product launch of a QD device. This talk will describe the pathway, and pitfalls, to this milestone.
  • Researchers in the laboratory of Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering and head of the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, have developed a Quad HD TV chip which has already demonstrated a fourfold increase in TV screen resolution. The new MIT Quad HD TV chip is being presented this week at the International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco.
  • Timothy Lu, MIT assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering working with members of the Synthetic Biology Group in the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has successfully created new synthetic biology circuits that combine memory and logic allowing potential control over production of cells to generate biofuels, drugs or other useful compounds. Read more...
  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandraksan announced the appointment of Dirk Englund as the Jamieson Career Development Professor. Prof. Englund joined the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department faculty in January 2013 as Assitant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.
  • Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.
  • In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.
  • Jesús del Alamo, the Donner Professor, MacVicar Faculty Fellow and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT is the recipient of the 2012 Electron Devices Society (EDS) Education Award. On receiving this award at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco on Dec. 10, 2012, Prof. del Alamo was cited by the EDS “for pioneering contributions to the development of online laboratories for microelectronics education on a worldwide scale.”
  • Judy Hoyt, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the MIT EECS Department, has teamed with colleagues in the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) to design a new kind of p-type transistor using germanium (not silicon). The team has successfully demonstrated that the p-type transistor can achieve speeds twice as fast as current experimental p-type transistors and nearly four times as fast as the best commercially produced p-type transistors.
  • EECS researchers including professors Vladimir Bulovic, Jing Kong and Mildred Dresselhaus and postdoctoral associate Hyesung Park and graduate student Joel Jean have joined MIT colleagues including associate professor of materials science and engineering Silvija Gradecak and postdoctoral associate Sehoon Chang, to produce a new kind of flexible and solar cell based on graphene paired with nanowires and quantum dots. This work could rival the current use of silicon crystals or indium tin oxide (ITO) and is predicted to be scalable for alternative use to the silicon or ITO models.
  • A team from the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) including Jesús del Alamo, the Donner Professor of Science in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), EECS graduate student Jianqian Lin, and Dimitri Antoniadis, the Ray and Maria Stata Professor of Electrical Engineering have used indium gallium arsenide to build nanometer-sized metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) that can outpace silicon providing the smallest non-silicon transistors yet.
  • Luis Velásquez-García, a principal research scientist at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratories, and his group have created a new system for spinning nanofibers—one that should offer significant productivity increases while drastically reducing power consumption. They will be presenting this work at the International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications in December.
  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.
  • Calling it a glimpse into the future, technology news website CRN has hailed MIT EECS/CSAIL faculty and the new Wireless@MIT center as the source for seven new technologies that will impact (favorably) our daily lives. Read more...
  • Jesus del Alamo, Donner Professor, MacVicar Faculty Fellow and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the EECS Department at MIT received the Semiconductor Research Corporation 2012 Technical Excellence Award in recognition for the fabrication of nanometer-scale transistors with world-record high frequency operation, as well as the investigation of the use of III-V compound semiconductors to enable a new generation of deeply scaled transistors for future digital applications.
  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!