Research

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  • Dina Katabi has been selected for the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. In announcing this appointment, Department Head Anantha Chandraksan shared the following message with his colleagues in the EECS Department. Read more.
  • Prof. Daniela Rus, Director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and head of the Distributed Robotics Lab (DRL) envisions new ways for design and manufacture of robots — including the potential for one robot per child in schools. She and members from the DRL group received multiple prizes at the Ultra-Affordable Robot competition particularly for the group's printable, origami-inspired Segway robot, called SEG, which won first place.
  • Today, March 12, 2014, marks the 25th anniversary of Tim Berners-Lee's proposal for managing general information about accelerators and experiments at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research based in Geneva where Berners-Lee worked at the time as a software engineer. He proposed building a distributed (global) hypertext system which he initially called "Mesh" updating it a year later to the "World Wide Web" as he wrote the code. Read more.
  • Ljubisa Stevanovic, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 34-401
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab's Leslie Kaelbling, the Panasonic Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in collaboration with members of her research group the Learning and Intelligent Systems Group have developed a new way to use "multiagent systems" to allow for teams of robots to accomplish tasks requiring flexibility and communication in uncertain environments. Read more.
  • Srini Devadas has been selected to receive the IEEE Computer Society’s 2014 Technical Achievement Award “For pioneering work in secure hardware, including the invention of Physical Unclonable Functions and single-chip secure processor architectures.” Read more.
  • Marvin Minsky, a faculty member in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science since 1958 and co-founder (in 1959) of the Artificial Intelligence Lab (now the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory), has been recognized the the BBVA Foundation for his lifetime achievements in establishing the field of artificial intelligence as well as his contributions to mathematics, cognitive science, robotics and philosophy.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department graduate student Mohsen Ghaffari, also a member of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has developed a new way to use “vertex connectivity” that could ultimately lead to communication protocols that will allow as much network bandwidth as possible. Ghaffari and members of an international team will present this work in January at the ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms in Portland, Oregon.
  • CSAIL Principal Investigator Srini Devadas and three former students have been selected as the 2014 winners of the Most Influential Paper Award at a prestigious systems research conference. Read more.
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's (CSAIL) Aude Oliva, associate professor of cognitive science at MIT's Brain and Cognitive Sciences working with her CSAIL colleagues including Antonio Torralba, associate professor in MIT's Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and also a member of in the MIT Computer Vision Group has developed an algorithm to slightly modify a person's face — making it more memorable without altering that person's overall appearance.
  • Manolis Kellis, associate professor of computer science at MIT has teamed with a former CSAIL postdoc to combine work developing algorithms that predict how strands of RNA are likely to unfold with a team of computational biologists at MIT and with experimental biologists at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) to identify biologically meaningful RNA folds within living cells. Published in Nature this week, this work shows promised for understanding RNA machinery -- a major avenue towards understanding genetic and biological function in living cells.
  • Prof. Dina Katabi, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab at MIT working with members of her research group has developed a 3-D motion tracking system that has potential for gaming and far more. Read more in the CSAIL Dec. 12, 2013 article
  • Professor Piotr Indyk and members of his group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed an algorithm that betters his (and Prof. Dina Katabi's) work to develop a faster than fast Fourier Transform in 2012. The new algorithm that uses the minimum possible number of samples to analyze signals has the potential to allow advances in medical devices such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machines to scan patients.
  • Professor Alan Willsky, has been selected to receive the 2013 SPS Society Award of the IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS). Willsky is the Edwin Sibley Webster professor of electrical engineering and computer science and director of the MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) at MIT. Read more.
  • Professors Dina Katabi and Nir N. Shavit have been elected to 2013 Fellow by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM). As part of a select 1% of ACM membership, Fellows are recognized “for their contributions to computing that are driving innovations across multiple domains and disciplines - accelerating the digital revolution and impacting every dimension of how we live work and play.” Read more.
  • Tuesday, November 26th, 2013, 34-101, @4:15pm. Refreshments @ 4:00pm.
  • The Big Data Initiative at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) today announced two new activities aimed at improving the use and management of Big Data. The first is a series of data challenges designed to spur innovation in how people use data to solve problems and make decisions. Read more.
  • At this month’s IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transport Systems, Berthold Horn, professor of computer science and engineering in the EECS Department at MIT and member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), presented a new algorithm for alleviating traffic flow instabilities, which he believes could be implemented by a variation of the adaptive cruise-control systems that are an option on many of today’s high-end cars. Read more.
  • EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced today the appointment of Professor Daniela Rus as the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The Chair was established in 1999 by Andrew and Erna to recognize significant contributions in the field of communications and signal processing. Prof. Ronald Rivest was the first chair holder of the Viterbi Professorship. Read more.
  • EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced today the appointment of Ron Rivest as the new holder of the Vannevar Bush Professorship. The Bush Chair is an Institute-wide professorship established in 1982 as a memorial to one of the outstanding scientists and engineers of the twentieth century.
  • MIT EECS faculty members in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab CSAIL Frans Kaashoek, Nickolai Zeldovich and Armando Solar-Lezama along with EECS graduate student Xi Wang have created a system they call Stack which will automatically scan programmer's code to avoid compilers from tossing bits of code that might not appear essential. Read more.
  • Self-assembling robots were dismissed even by Daniela Rus, professor of computer science and engineering and director of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), until she worked again with former MIT EECS senior John Romanishin, now a research scientist in CSAIL and the one who was convinced (since his undergraduate days) that it could be done. They will present their work on the new self-propelled robots at the IEEE RSJ International conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. Read more.
  • Dina Katabi, professor in the MIT EECS Department, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and co-director of Wireless@MIT has been selected as a 2013 MacArthur Fellow. She is cited by the MacArthur Fellows Program for her work "at the interface of computer science and electrical engineering to improve the speed, reliability, and security of data exchange. Katabi has contributed to a range of networking issues, from protocols to minimize congestion in high-bandwidth networks to algorithms for spectrum analysis, though most of her work centers on wireless data transmission."
  • Daniel Sanchez, assistant professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and his student Nathan Beckmann have developed a software alternative to manage high-speed on-chip memory (cache). Read more
  • EECS graduate students Alessandro Chiesa and Madars Virza have teamed to develop a new system which can detect tampering in the cloud. The team presented their system, which is described as a practical, succinct zero-knowledge proof for arbitrary programs, at the International Cryptology Conference in August. Read more