Research

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  • The Big Data Initiative at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) today announced two new activities aimed at improving the use and management of Big Data. The first is a series of data challenges designed to spur innovation in how people use data to solve problems and make decisions. Read more.
  • MIT EECS faculty members in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab CSAIL Frans Kaashoek, Nickolai Zeldovich and Armando Solar-Lezama along with EECS graduate student Xi Wang have created a system they call Stack which will automatically scan programmer's code to avoid compilers from tossing bits of code that might not appear essential. Read more.
  • Daniel Sanchez, assistant professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and his student Nathan Beckmann have developed a software alternative to manage high-speed on-chip memory (cache). Read more
  • The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) announced on July 25, 2013 that Professor William Freeman has been honored with the Test of Time Award for his paper "Orientation Histograms for Hand Gesture Recognition,” co-written by Michal Roth in 1995. The award was presented at the 2013 IEEE Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition Conference in Shanghai, China.
  • Researchers from CSAIL and Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing have developed a TCP congestion-control system called Remy, which they will present at the annual conference of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Data Communications. Hari Balakrishnan, the Fujitsu Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and EECS graduate student Keith Winstein are the authors of the work titled "TCP ex Machina: Computer-Generated Congestion Control".
  • EECS Professors Regina Barzilay and Martin Rinard (and their respective graduate students Nate Kushman and Tao Lei) have demonstrated that ordinary language can be used (in specific cases) to aid in generating code for computer programs. Read more
  • Faculty members in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are converging on a wide range of research issues through game theory, which used to be a staple of economics research in the 1950s. EECS faculty members Asuman Ozdaglar, Costis Daskalakis, Munther Dahleh, and Silvio Micali discuss their approaches in this Technology Review feature. Read more.
  • As noted on the CSAIL website: The Simons Foundation has announced that Professor Piotr Indyk has been selected as a Simons Investigator. Indyk is one of 13 mathematicians, theoretical physicists and computer scientists named as 2013 Simons Investigators and one of two professors at MIT selected for the honor. Read more
  • Srini Devadas, the Edwin Sibley Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and members of the Computational Structures Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed a new system that not only disguises a server's memory-access patterns, but also prevents attacks that rely on how long computations take.
  • In a paper they are presenting this summer at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference, EECS graduate student Guha Balakrishnan and his advisors, both faculty members in the MIT EECS Department, John Guttag and Fredo Durand, describe a new algorithm they developed to measure the heart rates of people in video. The algorithm allows for analyzing the digital data for small imperceptible movements that are caused by the rush of blood from the heart's contractions. Data could ultimately aid in predicting heart disease.
  • Kuang Xu, a graduate student in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science [photo, right], and his advisor, John Tsitsiklis, the Clarence J. Lebel Professor of Electrical Engineering, have demonstrated in a series of recent papers that a little versatility in operations management, cloud computing and even health-care delivery and manufacturing could save exponential reduction in delays.
  • The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has announced that it is honoring Professor Piotr Indyk and Professor Dina Katabi for their innovations in computing technology. Indyk has been named one of the recipients of the Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award, which honors specific theoretical accomplishments that have had a significant and demonstrable effect on the practice of computing. Katabi has been honored as one of the recipients of the Grace Murray Hopper Award, which recognizes the outstanding young computer professionals of the year.
  • Professor Rob Miller is one of four MIT faculty selected as 2013 MacVicar Faculty Fellow for outstanding undergraduate teaching, mentoring and educational innovation. One recommender wrote: “I think Rob embodies the ideal of an MIT teacher — caring, engaging, tirelessly working on behalf of the students, eliciting respect, admiration, and joy from the students.”
  • Researchers working with EECS faculty member and CSAIL principal investigator Samuel Madden, are developing a new system called DBSeer to address the realities of cloud computing -- particularly database applications requiring over expenditure for hardware. In June, Professor Madden and members of the MIT Database Group including first author of two papers on this work, postdoctoral associate Barzan Mozafari will present their work at the annual meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Management of Data (SIGMOD).
  • "In our heads it's like a big world of small motions out there." Bill Freeman, professor of electrical engineering and computer science and associate department head of the Electrical Engineeering and Computer Science Department at MIT describes in a NY Times video his software that enables video magification to see what we can't normally see but might like to.
  • Anant Agarwal, president of edX, the worldwide, online learning initiative of MIT and Harvard University and professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He is recognized “for contributions to shared-memory and multicore computer architectures.”
  • With the fall 2012 launch of the bigdata@csail center, which represents a focused effort to understand and put to good use the huge amounts of data generated all the time, a handful of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are contributing specifically to medical applications. The MIT News Office has featured the work of Peter Szolovits, John Guttag, Alan Willsky and -- perhaps at the heart of abstractly looking at big data and medicine -- former EECS undergraduate and masters degree student David Rashef, now an MD/PhD student with the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology (HST) program. Read more...
  • In an effort to bring a more human dimension to the online education experience, MIT Professor Rob Miller and EECS graduate students Mason Tang and Elena Tatarchenko have developed a new computer system that will help provide students with feedback on their homework assignments and create more interaction between students, teachers, and alumni.
  • In the effort to handle data overload, Daniela Rus, professor of computer science MIT and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with postdoctoral associate Daniel Feldman to describe a novel way to represent data so that it takes up much less space in memory but can still be processed in conventional ways when needed.
  • Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston, who earned his undergraduate degree in computer science at MIT in 2005 and teamed with then EECS undergraduate student Arash Ferdowsi to found the company, will be the MIT June 7, 2013 Commencement speaker. "I’ve had some of the most formative experiences of my life at MIT,” Houston says. “It’s where Dropbox started and where I met my co-founder, Arash, so it’s an honor to come back and share my story. Technology is at the heart of how we shape our future and confront our challenges, and more than ever the world needs MIT graduates to lead us forward.”
  • Hal Abelson, the Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at MIT and principal investigator at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and computer science student Kang Zhang have developed a crowd sourcing system that has analyzed the tweets of roughly 10 million U.S. voters as the national election came and went. Read more...
  • In celebration of its 40th anniversary, the EE Times is recognizing the innovators who made the electronics industry what it is today and particularly the visionaries who are creating new paths. Several members of the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department are among the ten visionaries selected including Rodney Brooks and Wireless@MIT. Read more.
  • At the Interdisciplinary Workshop on Information and Decision in Social Networks at MIT on November 8-9, Associate Professor Devavrat Shah and his student Stanislav Nikolov, will present a new algorithm that can, with 95 percent accuracy, predict which topics will trend an average of an hour and a half before Twitter’s algorithm puts them on the list — and sometimes as much as four or five hours before. Read more...
  • CSAIL researchers and members of the Clinical Decision Making Group including the group's director Peter Szolovits, professor of computer science and engineering and postdoctoral researcher Anna Rumshisky have developed a new system for disambiguating (distinguishing between several meanings) the senses of words used in doctors’ clinical notes. Read more...
  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.