Nanotechnology & Quantum Information Processing

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  • Researchers in the laboratory of Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering and head of the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, have developed a Quad HD TV chip which has already demonstrated a fourfold increase in TV screen resolution. The new MIT Quad HD TV chip is being presented this week at the International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco.
  • Timothy Lu, MIT assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering working with members of the Synthetic Biology Group in the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has successfully created new synthetic biology circuits that combine memory and logic allowing potential control over production of cells to generate biofuels, drugs or other useful compounds. Read more...
  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandraksan announced the appointment of Dirk Englund as the Jamieson Career Development Professor. Prof. Englund joined the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department faculty in January 2013 as Assitant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.
  • Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.
  • In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.
  • Jesús del Alamo, the Donner Professor, MacVicar Faculty Fellow and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT is the recipient of the 2012 Electron Devices Society (EDS) Education Award. On receiving this award at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco on Dec. 10, 2012, Prof. del Alamo was cited by the EDS “for pioneering contributions to the development of online laboratories for microelectronics education on a worldwide scale.”
  • Judy Hoyt, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the MIT EECS Department, has teamed with colleagues in the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) to design a new kind of p-type transistor using germanium (not silicon). The team has successfully demonstrated that the p-type transistor can achieve speeds twice as fast as current experimental p-type transistors and nearly four times as fast as the best commercially produced p-type transistors.
  • EECS researchers including professors Vladimir Bulovic, Jing Kong and Mildred Dresselhaus and postdoctoral associate Hyesung Park and graduate student Joel Jean have joined MIT colleagues including associate professor of materials science and engineering Silvija Gradecak and postdoctoral associate Sehoon Chang, to produce a new kind of flexible and solar cell based on graphene paired with nanowires and quantum dots. This work could rival the current use of silicon crystals or indium tin oxide (ITO) and is predicted to be scalable for alternative use to the silicon or ITO models.
  • A team from the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) including Jesús del Alamo, the Donner Professor of Science in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), EECS graduate student Jianqian Lin, and Dimitri Antoniadis, the Ray and Maria Stata Professor of Electrical Engineering have used indium gallium arsenide to build nanometer-sized metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) that can outpace silicon providing the smallest non-silicon transistors yet.

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