Research

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  • We study the inherent capabilities and limitations of computers: not just the computers of today, but any computers that could ever be built.

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  • MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) held a two day conference celebrating 50 years of computer science looking forward to the future with solutions for today's obstacles and tomorrow's solutions. Read more.
  • Postdoctoral associate in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Hamed Pirsiavash has developed a new algorithm that offers significant improvements in parsing video — linearly, no matter the length, with fixed requirement for memory and reaching conclusions in search more efficiently. Read more.
  • Imagine being curious enough as an 11 year old — on seeing your babysitter's mysterious calculus textbook symbols — to jump grades in order to leap several years ahead in math? Scott Aaronson, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and affiliate with the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), has always had a way of thinking beyond -- now looking for the truths in computational complexity, and consequently influencing the way computation is perceived and executed in the future. Read more.
  • Professor Piotr Indyk and members of his group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed an algorithm that betters his (and Prof. Dina Katabi's) work to develop a faster than fast Fourier Transform in 2012. The new algorithm that uses the minimum possible number of samples to analyze signals has the potential to allow advances in medical devices such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machines to scan patients.
  • EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced today the appointment of Ron Rivest as the new holder of the Vannevar Bush Professorship. The Bush Chair is an Institute-wide professorship established in 1982 as a memorial to one of the outstanding scientists and engineers of the twentieth century.
  • EECS graduate students Alessandro Chiesa and Madars Virza have teamed to develop a new system which can detect tampering in the cloud. The team presented their system, which is described as a practical, succinct zero-knowledge proof for arbitrary programs, at the International Cryptology Conference in August. Read more
  • CSAIL News: EECS professor Nancy Lynch, who heads the Theory of Distributed Systems Group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and EECS graduate student Moshen Ghaffari, and Cal Newport, a former graduate student in Lynch’s group who’s now an assistant professor of computer science at Georgetown University have used adversarial models in achieving greater network stability for adhoc networks, ie., for wireless device use.
  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced the appointment of Professor Albert Meyer as the new EECS Undergraduate Officer effective July 1, 2013. Prof. Meyer will take over from Professor Denny Freeman, who was recently chosen as the MIT Dean for Undergraduate Education.
  • As noted on the CSAIL website: The Simons Foundation has announced that Professor Piotr Indyk has been selected as a Simons Investigator. Indyk is one of 13 mathematicians, theoretical physicists and computer scientists named as 2013 Simons Investigators and one of two professors at MIT selected for the honor. Read more
  • EECS faculty members Shafi Goldwasser, and Nickolai Zeldovich, both members of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT, and EECS graduate student Raluca Ada Popa have teamed with colleagues at University of Toronto and Microsoft Research to report a development in the area of homomorphic encryption that offers a functional encryption scheme to maintain security of encrypted data in the cloud.
  • The Executive Committee of the MIT Corporation recently approved awarding tenure to seven School of Engineering faculty members including, Scott J. Aaronson, Associate Professor, effective July 1, 2013. Aaronson, also a principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, CSAIL,... read more.
  • The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has announced that it is honoring Professor Piotr Indyk and Professor Dina Katabi for their innovations in computing technology. Indyk has been named one of the recipients of the Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award, which honors specific theoretical accomplishments that have had a significant and demonstrable effect on the practice of computing. Katabi has been honored as one of the recipients of the Grace Murray Hopper Award, which recognizes the outstanding young computer professionals of the year.
  • MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali have won the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) A.M. Turing Award for their pioneering work in the fields of cryptography and complexity theory. Essentially laying the foundation for modern cryptography by formalizing the concept that cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute, the two have turned cryptography from an art into science -- and, in the process provided the basis for securing today's communications protocols, Internet transactions and cloud computing. They also made fundamental advances in the theory of computational complexity, an area that focuses on classifying computational problems according to their inherent difficulty.
  • In a paper titled "Ampli fication of Chosen-Ciphertext Security," two CSAIL postdoctoral associates Huijia (Rachel) Lin and Stefano Tessaro, who work with EECS Professor Shafi Goldwasser, have proposed a new technique aimed at protecting against the worst possible scenario in current enryption scheme vulnerabilities. This work will be presented in May this spring at the International Conference on the Theory and Applications of Cryptographic Techniques.
  • Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.
  • In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.
  • EECS faculty member Erik Demaine, professor of computer science at MIT, and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with members of the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms to develop a new kind of robotic device that mimics nature's folding of proteins to allow for all kinds of possible functionality.
  • In the effort to handle data overload, Daniela Rus, professor of computer science MIT and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with postdoctoral associate Daniel Feldman to describe a novel way to represent data so that it takes up much less space in memory but can still be processed in conventional ways when needed.
  • Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston, who earned his undergraduate degree in computer science at MIT in 2005 and teamed with then EECS undergraduate student Arash Ferdowsi to found the company, will be the MIT June 7, 2013 Commencement speaker. "I’ve had some of the most formative experiences of my life at MIT,” Houston says. “It’s where Dropbox started and where I met my co-founder, Arash, so it’s an honor to come back and share my story. Technology is at the heart of how we shape our future and confront our challenges, and more than ever the world needs MIT graduates to lead us forward.”
  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.
  • Cited for his work developing the RSA algorithm, a method for public-key cryptography, Ronald Rivest is named to the National Cyber Security Hall of Fame, Oct. 17, 2012.
  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!
  • Shafi Goldwasser, the RSA professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT and principal investigator with the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, is among three at MIT selected as Simons Investigator by the Simons Foundation.
  • Professor of applied math and computer science at MIT and head of the Computation and Biology Group, Bonnie Berger, with former and current students, has developed an algorithm that allows researchers to access huge amounts of data in geneome databases despite the rate of genome sequencing that threatens to outpace researchers' ability to analyze the added data.
  • Daskalakis, students use game theory to tackle 30 year economics problem - extending Nobel winner’s work on single-item auctions to auctions involving multiple items.