Research

SHARE:
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab's Leslie Kaelbling, the Panasonic Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in collaboration with members of her research group the Learning and Intelligent Systems Group have developed a new way to use "multiagent systems" to allow for teams of robots to accomplish tasks requiring flexibility and communication in uncertain environments. Read more.
  • Researchers at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory (MTL) including Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering, recent EECS PhD graduate Marcus Yip, EECS graduate student Rui Jin and research scientist Nathan Ickes, together with physicians from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI), have developed a new, low-power signal-processing chip that could lead to a cochlear implant that requires no external hardware. The implant would be wirelessly recharged -- taking just two minutes -- and would run for about eight hours on each charge. Read more.
  • Srini Devadas has been selected to receive the IEEE Computer Society’s 2014 Technical Achievement Award “For pioneering work in secure hardware, including the invention of Physical Unclonable Functions and single-chip secure processor architectures.” Read more.
  • Timothy K. Lu, Assistant Professor leading the Synthetic Biology Group in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Department of Biological Engineering and principal investigator in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has been selected for a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in support of work to understand biological cells as state machines leading to insights into natural biological systems and synthetic gene circuits. Read more.
  • Marvin Minsky, a faculty member in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science since 1958 and co-founder (in 1959) of the Artificial Intelligence Lab (now the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory), has been recognized the the BBVA Foundation for his lifetime achievements in establishing the field of artificial intelligence as well as his contributions to mathematics, cognitive science, robotics and philosophy.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department graduate student Mohsen Ghaffari, also a member of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has developed a new way to use “vertex connectivity” that could ultimately lead to communication protocols that will allow as much network bandwidth as possible. Ghaffari and members of an international team will present this work in January at the ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms in Portland, Oregon.
  • The Spanish Royal Academy of Engineering presented the "Agustin de Betancourt" award to Professor Tomás Palacios on Nov. 26. This award, the most prestigious given in Spain to an engineer less than 36 years old, recognizes Prof. Palacios’ work on nanotechnologies applied to high frequency electronic devices based on GaN and graphene.
  • CSAIL Principal Investigator Srini Devadas and three former students have been selected as the 2014 winners of the Most Influential Paper Award at a prestigious systems research conference. Read more.
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's (CSAIL) Aude Oliva, associate professor of cognitive science at MIT's Brain and Cognitive Sciences working with her CSAIL colleagues including Antonio Torralba, associate professor in MIT's Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and also a member of in the MIT Computer Vision Group has developed an algorithm to slightly modify a person's face — making it more memorable without altering that person's overall appearance.
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, professor in MIT's Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and the Harvard MIT Health Sciences and Technology, has developed a noninvasive and quick test for the presence of blood clots using nanoparticles. This test could potentially be used in detecting other health threatening issues such as cancer. Read more.
  • Manolis Kellis, associate professor of computer science at MIT has teamed with a former CSAIL postdoc to combine work developing algorithms that predict how strands of RNA are likely to unfold with a team of computational biologists at MIT and with experimental biologists at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) to identify biologically meaningful RNA folds within living cells. Published in Nature this week, this work shows promised for understanding RNA machinery -- a major avenue towards understanding genetic and biological function in living cells.
  • Jeffrey H. Shapiro has been elected to the grade of Fellow of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics. SPIE was founded in 1955 to advance light-based technologies. Shapiro, the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department is also a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the IEEE, the Institute of Physics, and the Optical Society of America. Read more.
  • Prof. Dina Katabi, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab at MIT working with members of her research group has developed a 3-D motion tracking system that has potential for gaming and far more. Read more in the CSAIL Dec. 12, 2013 article
  • Professor Piotr Indyk and members of his group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed an algorithm that betters his (and Prof. Dina Katabi's) work to develop a faster than fast Fourier Transform in 2012. The new algorithm that uses the minimum possible number of samples to analyze signals has the potential to allow advances in medical devices such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machines to scan patients.
  • Prof. Mildred Dresselhaus, Institute professor emerita and faculty member in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Physics Departments, received the Materials Research Society Von Hippel Award in recognition of her work and close association with Prof. Von Hippel. Read more.
  • Professor Alan Willsky, has been selected to receive the 2013 SPS Society Award of the IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS). Willsky is the Edwin Sibley Webster professor of electrical engineering and computer science and director of the MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) at MIT. Read more.
  • Professors Dina Katabi and Nir N. Shavit have been elected to 2013 Fellow by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM). As part of a select 1% of ACM membership, Fellows are recognized “for their contributions to computing that are driving innovations across multiple domains and disciplines - accelerating the digital revolution and impacting every dimension of how we live work and play.” Read more.
  • Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Principal Research Scientist Luis Velasquez-Garcia, with members of his research group has developed a new way to perform x-rays that not only includes soft tissue, but is streamlined to portable dimension cutting the dose and overall expense typical for current x-ray machines. The Velasquez-Garcia group is presenting their work at the 13th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2013), being held Dec. 3 to 6 in London. Read more
  • Under the direction of EECS professor Jeffrey Shapiro, and senior research scientist Franco Wong - both members of the Research Laboratory of Electronic's (RLE) Optical and Quantum Communications Group and of Vivek Goyal, RLE research scientist and head of the Signal Transformation and Information Representation Group, EECS doctoral student Ahmed Kirmani, working under Goyal, has developed a computational imager that uses one photon per pixel allowing laser rangefinders to infer depth (3D) from a hundredth as much light and produce images from one 900th the light needed. Read more.
  • Tuesday, November 26th, 2013, 34-101, @4:15pm. Refreshments @ 4:00pm.
  • "There's a very strong need for that computer to turn electrical signals into optical signals very efficiently," Dirk Englund the Jamieson Career Development Assistant Professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department explained to Marketplace Tech. Englund was approached to discuss his work in the Quantum Photonics Laboratory, where computer chips made of graphene and silicon are encouraging information to move near the speed of light. Read more.
  • Using artificial intelligence tools including probabilistic graphical models, Ying Liu, EECS graduate student working with Alan Willsky, EECS professor and director of the Laboratory for Information and Decisions Systems (LIDS) has developed a technique that can efficiently infer vital information about the propagation of flight delays at U.S. airports. Liu and Willsky will present their work, which has potential application to a wide range of areas, at the Neural Information Processing Systems Foundation in early December. Read more.
  • The Big Data Initiative at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) today announced two new activities aimed at improving the use and management of Big Data. The first is a series of data challenges designed to spur innovation in how people use data to solve problems and make decisions. Read more.
  • At this month’s IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transport Systems, Berthold Horn, professor of computer science and engineering in the EECS Department at MIT and member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), presented a new algorithm for alleviating traffic flow instabilities, which he believes could be implemented by a variation of the adaptive cruise-control systems that are an option on many of today’s high-end cars. Read more.
  • EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced today the appointment of Professor Daniela Rus as the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The Chair was established in 1999 by Andrew and Erna to recognize significant contributions in the field of communications and signal processing. Prof. Ronald Rivest was the first chair holder of the Viterbi Professorship. Read more.