Research

SHARE:
  • Until now the theoretical and much studied quasiparticle known as the exciton — responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits — has never been observed in action. Now researchers in the Center for EXcitonics in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT including EECS professors Marc Baldo and Vladimir Bulovic, and investigators at the City College of New York have imaged excitons' motions directly. Read more.
  • As the director of MIT’s BigData@CSAIL industry initiative, and the co-director of the more research-focused Intel Science and Technology Center (ISTC) for Big Data, EECS professor and CSAIL principal investigator Sam Madden talks with the MIT News Office about the growing complexity of data. From social networks and images to real time financial transactions, Madden talks about the issues (and opportunities) of what to do with this data. Read more.
  • Imagine being curious enough as an 11 year old — on seeing your babysitter's mysterious calculus textbook symbols — to jump grades in order to leap several years ahead in math? Scott Aaronson, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and affiliate with the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), has always had a way of thinking beyond -- now looking for the truths in computational complexity, and consequently influencing the way computation is perceived and executed in the future. Read more.
  • Dina Katabi has been selected for the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. In announcing this appointment, Department Head Anantha Chandraksan shared the following message with his colleagues in the EECS Department. Read more.
  • Muriel Médard has been appointed as the Cecil H. Green Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. In announcing this appointment, Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan shared the following message with his EECS colleagues. Read more.
  • Prof. Daniela Rus, Director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and head of the Distributed Robotics Lab (DRL) envisions new ways for design and manufacture of robots — including the potential for one robot per child in schools. She and members from the DRL group received multiple prizes at the Ultra-Affordable Robot competition particularly for the group's printable, origami-inspired Segway robot, called SEG, which won first place.
  • Dennis Freeman, professor of electrical engineering, and a team of researchers in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics has reported findings in the Biophysical Journal that our selective ability to distinguish sounds depends on the size and distribution of pores just a few nanometers wide in the inner ear's tectorial membrane. The work may ultimately lead to biochemical manipulation or other means to aid in improving hearing. Read more.
  • Prof. Henry I. Smith, Emeritus Professor of Electrical Engineering and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT, was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) at the Academy’s 3rd annual conference on March 7, 2014. Prof. Smith was cited “For innovative contributions to micro and nanofabrication technology and applications.”
  • Today, March 12, 2014, marks the 25th anniversary of Tim Berners-Lee's proposal for managing general information about accelerators and experiments at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research based in Geneva where Berners-Lee worked at the time as a software engineer. He proposed building a distributed (global) hypertext system which he initially called "Mesh" updating it a year later to the "World Wide Web" as he wrote the code. Read more.
  • Ljubisa Stevanovic, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 34-401
  • This year the Dan David Foundation International Board has selected Marvin Minsky to receive the Dan David Foundation Prize for the Future Time Dimension titled “Artificial Intelligence: The Digital Mind. Prof. Minsky was selected as one of the founders of the field of artificial intelligence. He is cited as among the most influential intellectuals of the twentieth century in a variety of disciplines, including AI, robotics, computation, learning, cognition, philosophy and optics. Read more.
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab's Leslie Kaelbling, the Panasonic Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in collaboration with members of her research group the Learning and Intelligent Systems Group have developed a new way to use "multiagent systems" to allow for teams of robots to accomplish tasks requiring flexibility and communication in uncertain environments. Read more.
  • Researchers at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory (MTL) including Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering, recent EECS PhD graduate Marcus Yip, EECS graduate student Rui Jin and research scientist Nathan Ickes, together with physicians from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI), have developed a new, low-power signal-processing chip that could lead to a cochlear implant that requires no external hardware. The implant would be wirelessly recharged -- taking just two minutes -- and would run for about eight hours on each charge. Read more.
  • Srini Devadas has been selected to receive the IEEE Computer Society’s 2014 Technical Achievement Award “For pioneering work in secure hardware, including the invention of Physical Unclonable Functions and single-chip secure processor architectures.” Read more.
  • Timothy K. Lu, Assistant Professor leading the Synthetic Biology Group in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Department of Biological Engineering and principal investigator in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has been selected for a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in support of work to understand biological cells as state machines leading to insights into natural biological systems and synthetic gene circuits. Read more.
  • Marvin Minsky, a faculty member in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science since 1958 and co-founder (in 1959) of the Artificial Intelligence Lab (now the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory), has been recognized the the BBVA Foundation for his lifetime achievements in establishing the field of artificial intelligence as well as his contributions to mathematics, cognitive science, robotics and philosophy.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department graduate student Mohsen Ghaffari, also a member of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has developed a new way to use “vertex connectivity” that could ultimately lead to communication protocols that will allow as much network bandwidth as possible. Ghaffari and members of an international team will present this work in January at the ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms in Portland, Oregon.
  • The Spanish Royal Academy of Engineering presented the "Agustin de Betancourt" award to Professor Tomás Palacios on Nov. 26. This award, the most prestigious given in Spain to an engineer less than 36 years old, recognizes Prof. Palacios’ work on nanotechnologies applied to high frequency electronic devices based on GaN and graphene.
  • CSAIL Principal Investigator Srini Devadas and three former students have been selected as the 2014 winners of the Most Influential Paper Award at a prestigious systems research conference. Read more.
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's (CSAIL) Aude Oliva, associate professor of cognitive science at MIT's Brain and Cognitive Sciences working with her CSAIL colleagues including Antonio Torralba, associate professor in MIT's Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and also a member of in the MIT Computer Vision Group has developed an algorithm to slightly modify a person's face — making it more memorable without altering that person's overall appearance.
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, professor in MIT's Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and the Harvard MIT Health Sciences and Technology, has developed a noninvasive and quick test for the presence of blood clots using nanoparticles. This test could potentially be used in detecting other health threatening issues such as cancer. Read more.
  • Manolis Kellis, associate professor of computer science at MIT has teamed with a former CSAIL postdoc to combine work developing algorithms that predict how strands of RNA are likely to unfold with a team of computational biologists at MIT and with experimental biologists at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) to identify biologically meaningful RNA folds within living cells. Published in Nature this week, this work shows promised for understanding RNA machinery -- a major avenue towards understanding genetic and biological function in living cells.
  • Jeffrey H. Shapiro has been elected to the grade of Fellow of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics. SPIE was founded in 1955 to advance light-based technologies. Shapiro, the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department is also a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the IEEE, the Institute of Physics, and the Optical Society of America. Read more.
  • Prof. Dina Katabi, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab at MIT working with members of her research group has developed a 3-D motion tracking system that has potential for gaming and far more. Read more in the CSAIL Dec. 12, 2013 article
  • Professor Piotr Indyk and members of his group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed an algorithm that betters his (and Prof. Dina Katabi's) work to develop a faster than fast Fourier Transform in 2012. The new algorithm that uses the minimum possible number of samples to analyze signals has the potential to allow advances in medical devices such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machines to scan patients.