I - Applied Physics and Devices

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  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and head of the Analog Circuits and Biological Systems Group in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) is featured by the Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) at MIT for his work that blends both biological (wet) and electronic analog circuits (dry) in research that could lead to newly engineered immune cells that could detect cancer cells and kill them, for example. Read more.
  • Until now the theoretical and much studied quasiparticle known as the exciton — responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits — has never been observed in action. Now researchers in the Center for EXcitonics in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT including EECS professors Marc Baldo and Vladimir Bulovic, and investigators at the City College of New York have imaged excitons' motions directly. Read more.
  • Researchers at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory (MTL) including Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering, recent EECS PhD graduate Marcus Yip, EECS graduate student Rui Jin and research scientist Nathan Ickes, together with physicians from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI), have developed a new, low-power signal-processing chip that could lead to a cochlear implant that requires no external hardware. The implant would be wirelessly recharged -- taking just two minutes -- and would run for about eight hours on each charge. Read more.
  • The Spanish Royal Academy of Engineering presented the "Agustin de Betancourt" award to Professor Tomás Palacios on Nov. 26. This award, the most prestigious given in Spain to an engineer less than 36 years old, recognizes Prof. Palacios’ work on nanotechnologies applied to high frequency electronic devices based on GaN and graphene.
  • Jeffrey H. Shapiro has been elected to the grade of Fellow of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics. SPIE was founded in 1955 to advance light-based technologies. Shapiro, the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department is also a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the IEEE, the Institute of Physics, and the Optical Society of America. Read more.
  • Prof. Mildred Dresselhaus, Institute professor emerita and faculty member in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Physics Departments, received the Materials Research Society Von Hippel Award in recognition of her work and close association with Prof. Von Hippel. Read more.
  • Under the direction of EECS professor Jeffrey Shapiro, and senior research scientist Franco Wong - both members of the Research Laboratory of Electronic's (RLE) Optical and Quantum Communications Group and of Vivek Goyal, RLE research scientist and head of the Signal Transformation and Information Representation Group, EECS doctoral student Ahmed Kirmani, working under Goyal, has developed a computational imager that uses one photon per pixel allowing laser rangefinders to infer depth (3D) from a hundredth as much light and produce images from one 900th the light needed. Read more.
  • "There's a very strong need for that computer to turn electrical signals into optical signals very efficiently," Dirk Englund the Jamieson Career Development Assistant Professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department explained to Marketplace Tech. Englund was approached to discuss his work in the Quantum Photonics Laboratory, where computer chips made of graphene and silicon are encouraging information to move near the speed of light. Read more.

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