Research

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  • Timothy Lu, assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department with EECS graduate student Samuel Perli and Fahim Farzadfard, MIT Biology Department graduate student have developed a technique that can turn genes on or off inside yeast and human cells -- a potential window on understanding the function of those genes and also leading to engineering genes that could perform useful functions. Read more.
  • Detecting early-stage malarial infection of blood cells is a diagnostic that has recently come closer to reality through the work of MIT's Anantha Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head, and Subra Suresh, former MIT Dean of Engineering, now president of Carnegie Mellon University. The work, which has been published Aug. 8 in the journal Lab on a Chip, is potentially applicable to detecting other infections and diseases.
  • Muriel Médard, professor of electrical engineering in the MIT EECS Department and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and EECS graduate student Falvio du Pin Calmon have teamed with researchers at the National University of Ireland to demonstrate that the security of many keyless-entry systems may not be as secure as previously thought. Médard and the NUI team will present their work at the Asilomar Conference on Signals and Systems in September.
  • Rodney Brooks, iRobot co-founder and Chairman and CTO of Rethink Robotics, was recently featured in the MIT News Office — following the selection by Technology Review of Rethink Robotics as one of 50 Disruptive Companies 2013. Founded by Brooks in 2008, Rethink Robotics is stocking manufacturers with easily taught assembly-line capable robots that can work safely alongside humans.
  • Sanjoy K. Mitter, professor of electrical engineering and principal investigator and former director of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems at MIT, has been selected as Fellow by the International Federation of Automatic Control. He is cited in this honor “for fundamental contributions to nonlinear filtering, stochastic control, optimization, optimal control, hybrid systems theory, and the unification of communication and control.”
  • CSAIL News: EECS professor Nancy Lynch, who heads the Theory of Distributed Systems Group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and EECS graduate student Moshen Ghaffari, and Cal Newport, a former graduate student in Lynch’s group who’s now an assistant professor of computer science at Georgetown University have used adversarial models in achieving greater network stability for adhoc networks, ie., for wireless device use.
  • Three CSAIL roboticists have been named to IEEE Intelligent Systems' 2013 list of "AI's 10 to Watch", which celebrates 10 rising stars in the field of artificial intelligence (AI). The CSAIL members named to the list are: Nora Ayanian, Finale Doshi-Velez and Stefanie Tellex.
  • Mehmet Fatih Yanik, associate professor of electrical engineering and biological engineering at MIT and head of the High-Throughput Neurotechnology Group based in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) has created his life's work by combining his training in physics and engineering with his passion for understanding the complexities of the human nervous system and how to determine therapeutics for neurological disorders. Read more...
  • James Fujimoto, the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT has been selected for the 2014 IEEE Photonics Award. The award, which is sponsored by the IEEE Photonics Society, is given in recognition of outstanding achievements in photonics. Prof. Fujimoto is cited “for pioneering the development and commercialization of optical coherence tomography for medical diagnostics.”
  • New research to be presented at the 2013 SIGGRAPH computer graphics conference could transform field of 3-D printing. Read about the work of EECS/CSAIL Professor Wojciech Matusik and his group to simplify the software that drives the 3D printing of multi-material objects. July 25 article by Abby Abazorius, CSAIL.
  • The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) announced on July 25, 2013 that Professor William Freeman has been honored with the Test of Time Award for his paper "Orientation Histograms for Hand Gesture Recognition,” co-written by Michal Roth in 1995. The award was presented at the 2013 IEEE Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition Conference in Shanghai, China.
  • Researchers from CSAIL and Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing have developed a TCP congestion-control system called Remy, which they will present at the annual conference of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Data Communications. Hari Balakrishnan, the Fujitsu Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and EECS graduate student Keith Winstein are the authors of the work titled "TCP ex Machina: Computer-Generated Congestion Control".
  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced the appointment of Professor Albert Meyer as the new EECS Undergraduate Officer effective July 1, 2013. Prof. Meyer will take over from Professor Denny Freeman, who was recently chosen as the MIT Dean for Undergraduate Education.
  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandraksan has announced the appointment of Prof. Jeffrey H. Lang to the Vitesse Professorship in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, effective July 1, 2013. The Vitesse Chair was established in 2000 to honor the Vitesse Semiconductor Corporation, a company co-founded in 1984 by former MIT students.
  • "Prof. Amar Bose made tremendous contributions to the EECS Department and was known to all of us – and to the students who were fortunate enough to interact with him – as a truly remarkable educator, researcher and mentor." Read more of the appreciation by EECS Dept. Head Anantha Chandrakasan of Dr. Amar Bose.
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  • EECS Professors Regina Barzilay and Martin Rinard (and their respective graduate students Nate Kushman and Tao Lei) have demonstrated that ordinary language can be used (in specific cases) to aid in generating code for computer programs. Read more
  • Faculty members in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are converging on a wide range of research issues through game theory, which used to be a staple of economics research in the 1950s. EECS faculty members Asuman Ozdaglar, Costis Daskalakis, Munther Dahleh, and Silvio Micali discuss their approaches in this Technology Review feature. Read more.
  • As noted on the CSAIL website: The Simons Foundation has announced that Professor Piotr Indyk has been selected as a Simons Investigator. Indyk is one of 13 mathematicians, theoretical physicists and computer scientists named as 2013 Simons Investigators and one of two professors at MIT selected for the honor. Read more
  • Joel Voldman engineers cutting-edge approaches to stem cell signaling, point of care therapeutics, and neuroengineering. In the never-ending mega study of how biological systems work, Joel Voldman’s mission is to understand the most basic interactions between single cells. To achieve that, he applies the power of microfluidics to isolate the actions and behaviors of single cells and the interactions between cells.
  • Read about Tomas Palacios, the Emmanuel E. Landsman Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, where he is a principal investigator in the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) in the July 3, 2013 MIT News Office article by Larry Hardesty titled "High potential - Tomás Palacios investigates use of ‘extreme materials’ in electronics, which could reduce energy consumption and make computers far faster."
  • EECS faculty member Dina Katabi, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and her graduate student Fadel Adib have developed a system (dubbed Wi-Vi) which uses low-cost wireless technology to track moving humans behind walls.
  • Srini Devadas, the Edwin Sibley Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and members of the Computational Structures Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed a new system that not only disguises a server's memory-access patterns, but also prevents attacks that rely on how long computations take.
  • In a paper they are presenting this summer at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference, EECS graduate student Guha Balakrishnan and his advisors, both faculty members in the MIT EECS Department, John Guttag and Fredo Durand, describe a new algorithm they developed to measure the heart rates of people in video. The algorithm allows for analyzing the digital data for small imperceptible movements that are caused by the rush of blood from the heart's contractions. Data could ultimately aid in predicting heart disease.
  • EECS faculty member John Guttag has lead a collaborative effort between MITx, edX and the City of Chicago to offer a six weeks Intro to Computer Science and Programming -- including Python -- to the city's high school students. "A Taste of Python Programming" is an adaptation of 6.00x, among the most popular of MOOCs offered by MITx and includes video lectures recorded by MIT Chancellor W. Eric Grimson and EECS Senior Lecturer Chris Terman.
  • Srini Devadas and Jacob White have been selected for their significant contributions to the Design Automation Conference (DAC), which celebrated its 50th anniversary June 2 -6. Both were recognized for their impact on the course of DAC’s history.