EECS Professor James Fujimoto and two colleagues win European Inventor Award for 2017

The European Patent Office (EPO) has recognized American engineers James G. Fujimoto and Eric A. Swanson and German physicist Robert Huber with the 2017 European Inventor Award for their development of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). The team was distinguished in the Non-EPO Countries category, one of five categories for the annual award.

27 EECS seniors inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

Twenty-seven EECS students were among 87 members of the MIT Class of 2017 who were recently inducted into the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa honor society. A faculty committee annually selects inductees "in recognition of their excellent academic records and commitment to the objectives of a liberal education," according to the announcement from the society's Xi chapter at MIT. No more than 10 percent of each graduating class will be invited to join. Congratulations to:

Drones that drive

Photo: Brandon Araki |CSAIL

 

Rachel Gordon | CSAIL

Being able to both walk and take flight is typical in nature — many birds, insects, and other animals can do both. If we could program robots with similar versatility, it would open up many possibilities: Imagine machines that could fly into construction areas or disaster zones that aren’t near roads and then squeeze through tight spaces on the ground to transport objects or rescue people.

Computational origami

Image: Christine Daniloff/MIT

 

By Larry Hardesty | MIT News

In a 1999 paper, Erik Demaine — now an MIT professor of electrical engineering and computer science, but then an 18-year-old PhD student at the University of Waterloo, in Canada — described an algorithm that could determine how to fold a piece of paper into any conceivable 3-D shape.

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