In the Media

  • February 12, 2015
    Professor Rob Miller and members of the User Interface Design Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have devised a system that uses crowd-sourcing to annotate instructional videos for improved learning. Read more.
  • February 5, 2015
    Five members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department of a total of eight MIT faculty have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering including Hari Balakrishnan, Sangeeta Bhatia, Anantha Chandrakasan, L. Rafael Reif and Daniela Rus. Read more.
  • February 2, 2015
    In building multicore chips, a common inefficiency arises with the addition of more than eight cores. EECS professor Nir Shavit, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), a former student now at Microsoft Research and several EECS graduate students have analyzed data structures called priority codes and dodged logjams using skip code. Read more.
  • January 12, 2015
    In a paper appearing in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Robotics Research, Professors and member of the Learning and Intelligent Systems Group Leslie Kaelbling and Tomas Lozano Perez and EECS graduate student Lawson Wong show that a system using an off-the-shelf algorithm to aggregate different perspectives can recognize four times as many objects as one that uses a single perspective, while reducing the number of misidentifications. Read more.
  • January 9, 2015
    A record number of Fellow selections from any single institution marks the election by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) of five CSAIL researchers and members of the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department to ACM 2014 Fellow. The ACM has cited Srini Devadas, Eric Grimson, Robert Morris, Ronitt Rubinfeld and Daniela Rus for "providing key knowledge" to computing.
  • December 28, 2014
    Adam Chilpala, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and the Douglas Ross Career Development Professor of Software Technology has developed a new programming language called Ur/Web that promises to take the drudgery out of Web development. Read more.
  • December 23, 2014
    MIT Computer Scientists Demonstrate the Hard Way That Gender Still Matters BY ELENA GLASSMAN, NEHA NARULA AND JEAN YANG "We're 3 female computer scientists at MIT, here to answer questions about programming and academia. Ask us anything!" we wrote for our Reddit Ask Me Anything session last Friday. Read more.
  • December 22, 2014
    CSAIL postdoc and member of the MIT Computational Biology Group, Andreas Pfenning and collaborators at Duke University have reported findings on large data studies comparing song bird genomics with humans and primates. Vocal-learning birds and primates have common genes that could help pinpoint genetic disorders in humans such as stuttering or Huntington's Disease. Read more.
  • December 13, 2014
    On Dec. 11, 2014, the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab hosted 150 local students for its first annual “Hour of Code” demo fair, tied to the international initiative aimed at getting young people excited about programming. Read more.
  • November 19, 2014
    A new cybersecurity center made possible by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation will focus on cyber security policy -- one of three new academic initiatives (also at Stanford and UC Berkeley) aimed at laying the foundations for smart, sustainable policy to deal with the growing global cyber threats. Read more.
  • October 30, 2014
    At this year’s Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications (OOPSLA) conference, EECS faculty member Martin Rinard and several students from his group in MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory presented a new system that lets programmers identify sections of their code that can tolerate inconsequential error. The system, dubbed Chisel, then determines which program instructions to assign to unreliable hardware components, to maximize energy savings yet still meet the programmers’ accuracy requirements. Read more.
  • October 29, 2014
    Rodney Brooks, Founder, Chairman, CTO of Rethink Robotics and Panasonic Professor of Robotics (emeritus) at MIT, has spent his life creating intelligent machines that do our bidding. Read more about him and why he fears there will not be enough workforce robots in the future.
  • October 21, 2014
    Using Bayesian regression, Devavrat Shah, member of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (LIDS) and recent graduate student Kang Zhang have identified patterns from five months of price data from all major Bitcoin exhanges — enabling them to predict the price of Bitcoin — thereby allowing them to double their investment over a 50 day period. Read more.
  • September 16, 2014
    Li-Shiuan Peh, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the EECS Department at MIT has teamed to develop a new system that directs drivers using GPS to avoid traffic congestion. The work won the group one of the best-paper awards at the Intelligent Transportation Systems World Congress last week. Read more.
  • September 10, 2014
    Principal investigator in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab Charles E. Leiserson is the recipient of the ACM/IEEE Computer Society 2014 Ken Kennedy Award, in recognition of his important impact on parallel computing systems. Read more.
  • August 15, 2014
    Getting to the source of data-visualization aberrations is a big problem in big data. EECS doctoral student Eugene Wu with Sam Madden, professor of computer science and engineering in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have released a new tool, called DBWipes, that pinpoints aberrations and determines which data sources to investigate. Read more.
  • August 12, 2014
    A team led by Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) researchers including EECS associate professor Wojciech Matusik and project lead and doctoral candidate Adriana Schulz has developed “Fab By Example,” the first data-driven method to help people design products, with a growing database of templates that allow users to customize thousands of complex items — without the need to understand the mechanical engineering that might normally be expected. The team will be presenting its system at this month’s Siggraph graphics conference. Read more.
  • August 4, 2014
    Researchers at MIT -- including EECS graduate student Abe Davis and EECS faculty members Fredo Durand and Bill Freeman, and members of the Computer Graphics Group in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have collaborated with colleagues at Microsoft and Adobe to develop an algorithm to reconstruct an audio signal produced by practically invisible vibrations of objects filmed in video and normally inaudible to human hearing. Read more.
  • July 28, 2014
    Paying attention to the data that says MOOC learning is limited because of high drop rates and other negatives, CSAIL researchers have noted that students need help learning how to watch the videos and these researchers have developed a new way for students to learn how to watch MOOC videos called LectureScape. Read more.
  • July 19, 2014
    EECS faculty members Hari Balakrishnan and Devavrat Shah with EECS graduate students Jonathan Perry, and Amy Ousterhout, and Hans Fugal of Facebook have devised a new system to reduce delay time in data center queues. Using Fastpass, the name given to the new system, the group has experimentally reduced the average queue length of routers by as much as 99.6 percent in a Facebook data center. Read more.
  • July 11, 2014
    Light is everything to good photography. Knowing this fact well, EECS professor Fredo Durand, also an experienced photographer, has begun to create a new system that uses drones (light-equipped autonomous robots) to create accurate lighting while communicating with the camera-mounted interface. Durand and several other researchers will report on their work at an upcoming international symposium in August.
  • June 26, 2014
    Three EECS faculty members were recently the recipients of major awards. Dimitri Bertsekas received the 2014 American Automatic Control Council Richard Bellman Heritage Award, Rodney Brooks received the 2014 Engelberger Robotics Award for Leadership and the 2015 IEEE Robotics and Automation Award, and Sanjoy Mitter received the 2015 IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. Read more.
  • June 24, 2014
    The potential for multicore computing on a chip has gained new traction with the work by MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department faculty member Li-Shiuan Peh and EECS graduate student Bhavya Daya as they present a new 36-core chip on which each core acts as a mini Internet using a router to complete a communication network for data transport, while keeping local data up to date. Read more.
  • June 20, 2014
    Bernard Haeupler, PhD '13, has been selected by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) as recipient of the 2014 Doctoral Dissertation Award in Distributed Computing. Dr. Haeupler completed his thesis “Probabilistic Methods for Distributed Information Dissemination” in June 2013 under the co-supervision of Professors Jonathan Kelner, Muriel Médard, and David Karger at MIT.
  • June 20, 2014
    At the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition this month, EECS faculty member and associate department head William Freeman and colleagues from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) will present a new algorithm that can, with roughly 80 percent accuracy, determine whether a given snippet of video is playing backward or forward. Read more.