Dirk Englund and Daniel Sanchez join EECS Faculty

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Tuesday, March 12, 2013 - 6:45pm

New Faculty in EECS 2013: Dirk Englund and Daniel Sanchez
Two new faculty members were announced by EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan: Dirk Englund, who began as an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in January 2013 and Daniel Sanchez, who joined the EECS Department as Assistant Professor and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) in September 2013.

Dirk Englund received his BS in Physics from Caltech in 2002. Following a year at TU Eindhoven as a Fulbright Fellow, he did his graduate studies at Stanford, earning his MS in electrical engineering and PhD in Applied Physics in 2008. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University until 2010, when he became Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics at Columbia University. He moved to MIT in 2013 as Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a member of the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL).

His research focuses on quantum technologies based on semiconductor and optical systems. Recent recognitions include the 2012 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2012 IBM Faculty Award, the 2011 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the 2011 Sloan Research Fellowship in Physics, the 2008 Intelligence Community (IC) Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the 2012 IEEE-HKN Outstanding Young Professional Award. Englund heads the Quantum Photonics Laboratory.

Daniel Sanchez joined the EECS Department in September 2012 as an Assistant Professor and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL). Prof. Sanchez was appointed as the TIBCO Career Development Professor of computer science at the MIT School of Engineering. He earned a PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2012, an MS in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2009, and received a BS in telecommunications engineering from the Technical University of Madrid, Spain, in 2007.

Sanchez is broadly interested in computer architecture and computer systems. His research strives to improve the performance, efficiency and scalability of future parallel and heterogeneous systems, and to enable programmers to leverage their full capabilities easily. His current projects focus on designing parallel architectures that provide quality-of-service guarantees; building scalable and efficient memory hierarchies for thousand-core chips; introducing, exposing, and transparently managing heterogeneity in the memory hierarchy to improve efficiency; and designing dynamic fine-grained runtimes and schedulers using both software and hardware to improve the utilization and ease of use of these highly parallel systems.