• EECS Prof. Ron Rivest one of three awarded MIT's highest faculty honor.
  • System fixes bugs by importing functionality from other programs — without access to source code.
  • A high-school outreach program first brought Tamara Broderick to MIT in 2002. Now she's back, as an assistant professor in EECS.
  • New ultralow-power circuit developed by EECS graduate student Dina Reda El-Damak and department head Anantha Chandrakasan improves efficiency of energy harvesting to more than 80 percent.
  • Video-processing algorithm developed by the research groups of professors William Freeman and Frédo Durand magnifies motions indiscernible to the naked eye, even in moving objects.
  • EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan has announced the appointment of Christopher J. Terman as the new EECS Undergraduate Officer.
  • At the recent International Conference on Robotics and Automation, MIT researchers led by Daniela Rus, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, presented a printable origami robot that folds itself up from a flat sheet of plastic when heated and measures about a centimeter from front to back. Read more.
  • DARPA Robotics Challenge MIT Team leader Russ Tedrake reports on the real win in the team's sixth placement in last week's competition. The team not only won the overall best-paper award at the 2014 International Conference on Humanoid Robots, but they also accomplished research that will have huge near and longterm payoffs. Read more.
  • If a widely held assumption about computational complexity is correct, the problem of measuring the difference between two genomes — or texts, or speech samples, or anything else that can be represented as a string of symbols — can’t be solved more efficiently. Piotr Indyk, professor of computer science and engineering reports. Read more.
  • The MIT DARPA Robotics Challenge Team led by Professor Rus Tedrake reached new heights in the June 5-6 international DARPA Robotics Challenge in Pomona California, as they nimbly programmed their Atlas robot to perform a wide range of tasks in one hour. The goal of the event was to develop mobile robots to perform useful tasks in disaster-relief situations — in response to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. Read more.