• Members of the Optical and Quantum Communications Group in the Research Lab of Electronics (RLE) including Prof. Jeffrey Shapiro with senior research scientist Franco Wong and postdoc Zheshen Zhang have shown in a recent paper in Physical Review Letters that entanglement can improve optical sensor performance even if doesn't survive light's interaction with the environment. Read more.
  • Here’s one way to get kids excited about programming: a "robot garden" with dozens of fast-changing LED lights and more than 100 origami robots that can crawl, swim, and blossom like flowers. Read more.
  • When MIT senior Sheldon Trotman walks into any room, he almost instinctively looks for inefficiencies. The electrical engineering and computer science major is bent on streamlining our world, and has already founded several small companies that aim to do so. Read more.
  • Erna Viterbi, a warm and gracious philanthropist who with her husband, Qualcomm co-founder Andrew ’56, SM ’57, gave generously to MIT and a variety of other institutions, died Feb. 17 in San Diego. At MIT, the Viterbis established endowed professorships and fellowships for graduate students in the departments of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering. Four faculty members and more than 40 students on campus have benefited directly from their generosity. Read more.
  • On February 19th, the birthday of Nicolaus Copernicus, Professor James G. Fujimoto was awarded the Honorary Doctorate Degree at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland. Professor Fujimoto was awarded the University’s highest academic distinction, Doctor Honoris Causa. Read more.
  • This week, at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE's) International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), the group of Anantha Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head and the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor in Electrical Engineering at MIT, will present a new transmitter design that reduces power leakage when transmitters are idle — greatly extending battery life and ultimately enabling the potential for the transmission of data needed for the "Internet of things". Read more.
  • Yoel Fink, Director of MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics and professor of materials science and electrical engineering and computer sicence has teamed to develop multifunctional fibers made from abundant, low cost aluminum metal and silica glass. Read more.
  • Mapping the human genome, accomplished a decade ago, was heralded for laying the foundation for understanding genetic variation and links to a wide range of diseases. But genes can be switched on and off by many chemical modifications, aka "epigenetic marks." Now Manolis Kellis, EECS professor and member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab and the Broad Institute has led an NIH group that has created a similar map of the human epigenome. This work will lead to a global map towards understanding fundamental developmental and disease processes in humans. Read more.
  • Our susceptibility to disease depends both on the genes that we inherit from our parents and on our lifetime experiences. These two components — nature and nurture — seem to affect very different processes in the context of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published today in the journal Nature. Read more.
  • In the quest for improving the speed and efficiency of multicore chips, EECS Assistant Professor Daniel Sanchez and graduate student Nathan Beckmann designed a system that moves data around multicore chips' memory banks — improving execution by 18 percent on average while increasing energy efficiency as well. They won an award for this work in 2013. Now.. Read more.