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  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.
  • Calling it a glimpse into the future, technology news website CRN has hailed MIT EECS/CSAIL faculty and the new Wireless@MIT center as the source for seven new technologies that will impact (favorably) our daily lives. Read more...
  • MTL Fall Seminar Series, Special Wednesday Seminar in 34-401A, October 31, 2013, Prof. Chad Mirkin, A Chemist’s Approach to Nanofabrication: Towards a “Desktop Fab”.
  • As reported by the Champalimaud Foundation, the 2012 António Champalimaud Vision Award was given to several researchers including Professor James G. Fujimoto, Research Laboratory of Electronics affiliate Eric A. Swanson for the creation and development of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Fujimoto, the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering, Swanson, and their collaborators were recognized for the major role that OCT now plays in the diagnosis and treatment of the most important blinding diseases of the industrialized world: macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Currently, it is estimated that more than 40 million OCT diagnostic procedures are performed worldwide annually.
  • David Gifford, EECS professor and director of the Computational Genomics Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), working with members of his group, has developed a new algorithm for analyzing millions of experimentally identified DNA fragments and allowing the inference -- with 55% accuracy in the most difficult cases -- of the precise locations at which transcription factors bind to them. Read more!
  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!
  • Manolis Kellis, an associate professor of computer science at MIT and an associate member of the Broad Institute, is one of the lead computational scientists and authors of a paper that describes the functionality of the non-gene regions (about 80 percent) of the human genome, the so-called 'junk DNA'.
  • Polina Golland, associate professor in the MIT EECS department and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), working with EECS graduate student Archana Venkataraman has developed an algorithm which can aid in deciphering what regions of the brain are involved in certain diseases ultimately enabling drug companies to develop more effective treatments for the disease that specifically target these regions.

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