bio-EECS

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  • The Madrid-MIT M+Vision Consortium has been recognized by the Fundacion Tecnologia y Salud for accelerating health technology innovation. Dr Martha Gray (Harvard-MIT HST, EECS, RLE, IMES), M+Visión Director, accepted the award on behalf of the MIT members of the group. Read more.
  • EECS professor Ron Weiss has teamed with Mechanical Engineering professor Domitilla Del Vecchio and students from multiple departments at MIT to create a device that allows large biological circuits that behave with predictability nearly like that of electronic circuits. The work published this week in the journal Nature Biotechnology, has many applications -- particularly biosensing. Read more.
  • Timothy Lu, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering has come up with a new reason to engineer E. coli — so that genomic memory can be both long-term and analog -- not just on or off. The work appears in the latest online issue of Science and in The Scientist magazine. Read more.
  • Five EECS faculty and associated researchers are among the 14 MIT research teams selected to receive Deshpande research grants for fall 2014. Initiated in 2002 through the MIT School of Engineering and made possible by a gift from Desh and Jaishree Deshpande, the Center’s mission is to move technologies from the laboratories at MIT to the marketplace. Read more.
  • Mehmet Fatih Yanik has teamed to create a drug delivery pipeline using nanoparticles — enabling rapid testing in zebrafish for eventual delivery to human subjects of biologics, including antibodies, peptides, RNA and DNA. Read more.
  • In a two pronged attack on the killer superbugs that have become nearly unstoppable, Tim Lu, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and principal investigator in MIT's Research Lab of Electronics, has not only developed a gene editing system that can selectively kill the bacteria carrying harmful genes that confer antibiotic resistance or cause disease, but also devised a way of identifying combinations of genes that work together to make bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics. Read more.
  • Ph.D. candidates Phillip Nadeau (EECS/MTL) and Mark Mimee (Microbiology) have won a Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship for their joint proposal: “BacMOS: Electronic bio-sensors using synthetic biological transducers.” The fellowship, sponsored by Qualcomm Inc is designed to "cultivate new and forward thinking ideas and continue to further research and development overall.” (https://www.qualcomm.com/invention/research/university-relations/innovation-fellowship)
  • Cited for her work as doctor, engineer and scientist to design nano and micro technologies that pioneer new ways to understand and fight disease, Sangeeta N. Bhatia, the John J. (1929) and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) has been awarded the Lemelson-MIT Prize. Read more.
  • A research team from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology including Jongyoon Han, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, has developed a new way to diagnose malaria using magnetic resonance relaxometry (MRR) — a technology that the group is adapting for inexpensive field deployable usage. Read more.
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, was interviewed recently by Jeremey Hobson on Boston NPR radio station WBUR's noon news program "Here and Now" about her work creating miniature livers for testing drugs. Listen to the podcast.

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