I - Circuits

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  • Five EECS faculty and associated researchers are among the 14 MIT research teams selected to receive Deshpande research grants for fall 2014. Initiated in 2002 through the MIT School of Engineering and made possible by a gift from Desh and Jaishree Deshpande, the Center’s mission is to move technologies from the laboratories at MIT to the marketplace. Read more.
  • Karl K. Berggren, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in MIT's EECS department and member of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) and the Research Lab of Electronics (RLE) and EECS graduate student Adam McCaughan have devised the Nanocryotron — the Ntron for shor — a new approach to a 1950s design, that now shows promise for use in superconducting computer chips at 50 - 100 times energy efficiency and greater processing power. Read more.
  • Institute professor Mildred Dresselhaus has teamed with fellow researchers in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and from MIT's Physics Department and Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) to identify a promising light source for optoelectronic chips that can be tuned to different frequencies — crucial to realizing the full potential of moving data with far greater energy efficiency. Read more.
  • Li-Shiuan Peh, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the EECS Department at MIT has teamed to develop a new system that directs drivers using GPS to avoid traffic congestion. The work won the group one of the best-paper awards at the Intelligent Transportation Systems World Congress last week. Read more.
  • Professor Ruonan Han joined the EECS department at MIT as an assistant professor in July 2014. As a principal investigator with the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL), Han will pursue work in ultra-high-speed circuits and systems. His research group, the Terahertz Integrated Electronics Group aims to explore microelectronic technologies to bridge the terahertz gap between microwave and infrared domains. Read more.
  • The potential for multicore computing on a chip has gained new traction with the work by MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department faculty member Li-Shiuan Peh and EECS graduate student Bhavya Daya as they present a new 36-core chip on which each core acts as a mini Internet using a router to complete a communication network for data transport, while keeping local data up to date. Read more.
  • Marc Baldo, MIT professor of electrical engineering has teamed with MIT’s Troy Van Voorhis, professor of chemistry and other researchers to understand the theory behind singlet excitonic fission -- a process by which extra electrons are produced by incoming photonic energy -- first observed in the 1960s. This new understanding of what materials will generate this added energy has potential for creating solar cells that demonstratew up to 25 per cent increased efficiency. Read more.
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and head of the Analog Circuits and Biological Systems Group in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) is featured by the Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) at MIT for his work that blends both biological (wet) and electronic analog circuits (dry) in research that could lead to newly engineered immune cells that could detect cancer cells and kill them, for example. Read more.
  • Dennis Freeman, professor of electrical engineering, and a team of researchers in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics has reported findings in the Biophysical Journal that our selective ability to distinguish sounds depends on the size and distribution of pores just a few nanometers wide in the inner ear's tectorial membrane. The work may ultimately lead to biochemical manipulation or other means to aid in improving hearing. Read more.

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