II - Computer Science (Theory)

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  • In the effort to handle data overload, Daniela Rus, professor of computer science MIT and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with postdoctoral associate Daniel Feldman to describe a novel way to represent data so that it takes up much less space in memory but can still be processed in conventional ways when needed.
  • Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston, who earned his undergraduate degree in computer science at MIT in 2005 and teamed with then EECS undergraduate student Arash Ferdowsi to found the company, will be the MIT June 7, 2013 Commencement speaker. "I’ve had some of the most formative experiences of my life at MIT,” Houston says. “It’s where Dropbox started and where I met my co-founder, Arash, so it’s an honor to come back and share my story. Technology is at the heart of how we shape our future and confront our challenges, and more than ever the world needs MIT graduates to lead us forward.”
  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.
  • Cited for his work developing the RSA algorithm, a method for public-key cryptography, Ronald Rivest is named to the National Cyber Security Hall of Fame, Oct. 17, 2012.
  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!
  • We study several natural problems in which an {\em unknown} distribution over an {\em unknown} population of vectors needs to be recovered from partial or noisy samples. Such problems naturally arise in a variety of contexts in learning, clustering, statistics, data mining and database privacy, where loss and error may be introduced by nature, inaccurate measurements, or on purpose.

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