II - Computer Science (Theory)

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  • Jouya Jadidian has been awarded the best student paper prize at IEEE PPPS 2013, the combined 19th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (PPC) and the 40th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) which was held June 2013 in San Francisco, CA, for the paper entitled, “Abrupt Changes in Streamer Propagation Velocity Driven by Electron Velocity Saturation and Microscopic Inhomogeneities.”
  • As noted on the CSAIL website: The Simons Foundation has announced that Professor Piotr Indyk has been selected as a Simons Investigator. Indyk is one of 13 mathematicians, theoretical physicists and computer scientists named as 2013 Simons Investigators and one of two professors at MIT selected for the honor. Read more
  • EECS faculty members Shafi Goldwasser, and Nickolai Zeldovich, both members of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT, and EECS graduate student Raluca Ada Popa have teamed with colleagues at University of Toronto and Microsoft Research to report a development in the area of homomorphic encryption that offers a functional encryption scheme to maintain security of encrypted data in the cloud.
  • The Executive Committee of the MIT Corporation recently approved awarding tenure to seven School of Engineering faculty members including, Scott J. Aaronson, Associate Professor, effective July 1, 2013. Aaronson, also a principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, CSAIL,... read more.
  • The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has announced that it is honoring Professor Piotr Indyk and Professor Dina Katabi for their innovations in computing technology. Indyk has been named one of the recipients of the Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award, which honors specific theoretical accomplishments that have had a significant and demonstrable effect on the practice of computing. Katabi has been honored as one of the recipients of the Grace Murray Hopper Award, which recognizes the outstanding young computer professionals of the year.
  • MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali have won the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) A.M. Turing Award for their pioneering work in the fields of cryptography and complexity theory. Essentially laying the foundation for modern cryptography by formalizing the concept that cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute, the two have turned cryptography from an art into science -- and, in the process provided the basis for securing today's communications protocols, Internet transactions and cloud computing. They also made fundamental advances in the theory of computational complexity, an area that focuses on classifying computational problems according to their inherent difficulty.
  • In a paper titled "Ampli fication of Chosen-Ciphertext Security," two CSAIL postdoctoral associates Huijia (Rachel) Lin and Stefano Tessaro, who work with EECS Professor Shafi Goldwasser, have proposed a new technique aimed at protecting against the worst possible scenario in current enryption scheme vulnerabilities. This work will be presented in May this spring at the International Conference on the Theory and Applications of Cryptographic Techniques.
  • Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.
  • In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.
  • EECS faculty member Erik Demaine, professor of computer science at MIT, and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with members of the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms to develop a new kind of robotic device that mimics nature's folding of proteins to allow for all kinds of possible functionality.

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