II - Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence)

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  • At the Interdisciplinary Workshop on Information and Decision in Social Networks at MIT on November 8-9, Associate Professor Devavrat Shah and his student Stanislav Nikolov, will present a new algorithm that can, with 95 percent accuracy, predict which topics will trend an average of an hour and a half before Twitter’s algorithm puts them on the list — and sometimes as much as four or five hours before. Read more...
  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.
  • How much does your smartphone know about you — even when it's turned off? Under the guidance of CSAIL Principal Investigator Hal Abelson, the Class of 1922 Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, CSAIL graduate students Fuming Shih and Frances Zhang are investigating how much certain smartphone applications know about users.
  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!
  • Manolis Kellis, an associate professor of computer science at MIT and an associate member of the Broad Institute, is one of the lead computational scientists and authors of a paper that describes the functionality of the non-gene regions (about 80 percent) of the human genome, the so-called 'junk DNA'.
  • The MIT News Office has featured Russ Tedrake, the X Consortium Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. From his beginnings -- not in computer science -- to his discovery, as an undergraduate, of computer programming as a means to achieve his passion to build things, Russ Tedrake has carved a path as a unique roboticist.
  • A new flexible robot that moves like an earthworm, called "Mesworm," has been devised by researchers from Harvard University, Seoul National University and MIT including EECS professor Daniela Rus, director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL). The robot, designed to stand up to tortuous conditions and still keep on moving in its earthworm-like manner, may prove useful under hazardous conditions that are tight and/or unreachable.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department PhD candidate Alec Rivers, working with EECS Associate Professor Fredo Durand and MIT Mechanical Engineering Department PhD candidate Ilan Moyer will be presenting a new digitally driven method for creating precise shapes with minimal human guidance at this week's Siggraph conference in Los Angeles.
  • Jonathan Ragan-Kelley, EECS graduate student and Andrew Adams, a CSAIL postdoc, have led the development of Halide, a new programming language for image-processing algorithms. Halide not only yields code that’s much shorter and clearer — but it is much faster and is now available online. At this month’s Siggraph, the premier graphics conference, Ragan-Kelley and Adams will present a paper on Halide, which they co-wrote with EECS faculty members Professors Saman Amarasinghe and Fredo Durand and with colleagues at Adobe and Stanford University.

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