II - Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence)

  • New model predicts wind speeds more accurately with three months of data than others do with 12.
  • MIT professors’ choice-modeling software predicts customer preferences for retailers.
  • System fixes bugs by importing functionality from other programs — without access to source code.
  • Video-processing algorithm developed by the research groups of professors William Freeman and Frédo Durand magnifies motions indiscernible to the naked eye, even in moving objects.
  • At the recent International Conference on Robotics and Automation, MIT researchers led by Daniela Rus, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, presented a printable origami robot that folds itself up from a flat sheet of plastic when heated and measures about a centimeter from front to back. Read more.
  • DARPA Robotics Challenge MIT Team leader Russ Tedrake reports on the real win in the team's sixth placement in last week's competition. The team not only won the overall best-paper award at the 2014 International Conference on Humanoid Robots, but they also accomplished research that will have huge near and longterm payoffs. Read more.
  • The MIT DARPA Robotics Challenge Team led by Professor Rus Tedrake reached new heights in the June 5-6 international DARPA Robotics Challenge in Pomona California, as they nimbly programmed their Atlas robot to perform a wide range of tasks in one hour. The goal of the event was to develop mobile robots to perform useful tasks in disaster-relief situations — in response to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. Read more.
  • EECS graduate students Andrew Spielberg and Stuart Baker, and postdoc Mehmet Dogar with EECS Professor and Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Daniela Rus have developed a new algorithm that significantly reduces the time it takes for several robots to plan and execute a task. Read more.
  • A computer vision enabled technology developed by a team of EECS faculty Bill Freeman and Frédo Durand and their students is enabling a new way to identify structural defects in objects. The group will report this latest work at the Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition in June. Read more.
  • EECS doctoral student Carrie Cai has devised a Google Chat extension to help users make the most of idle wait time between texts and instant-message replies. Termed WaitChatter, the app allows users to learn another language vocabulary while they wait and the app is adaptable to other IM platforms including Snapchat, Facebook, Skype and WhatsApp. Read more.


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