I - BioMedical Sciences & Engineering

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  • Anantha P. Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head and the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT has been selected as the winner of the 2013 IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits. The citation for the award reads "For pioneering techniques in low-power digital and analog CMOS design."
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a member of the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, has teamed with researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute, to develop an RNA-delivering nanoparticle system that allows clinical targeting to arrive at effective drug treatments.
  • Tim Lu, assistant professor of electrical engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, principal investigator in the Research Lab of Electronics at MIT, and Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has been working with colleagues at Boston University (BU), Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to build genetic circuit components in living cells to ultimately perform novel functions such as manufacturing new drugs, producing fuel, or even programming suicide of cancer cells.
  • Timothy K. Lu, EECS assistant professor and principal investigator with the MIT Research Lab of Electronics, RLE, is one of five MIT members selected for the presidential early career award for Scientists and Engineers - and one of 96 selected for this honor nationwide. Lu is cited for his contributions in establishing innovative synthetic biology platforms and for his pioneering applications of synthetic biology to materials science, nanotechnology and infectious diseases.
  • James Fujimoto has been appointed as the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering for a five-year term from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017.
  • Read the paper for this work, published in PLoS ONE: A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable Brain–Machine Interfaces Rapoport BI, Kedzierski JT, Sarpeshkar R (2012) A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable Brain–Machine Interfaces. PLoS ONE 7(6): e38436. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0038436 Conceptual schematic design for a system that harvests power from the cerebrospinal fluid, showing a plausible site of implantation within the subarachnoid space. The inset at right is a micrograph of one prototype, showing the metal layers of the anode (central electrode) and cathode contact (outer ring) patterned on a silicon wafer. Image Credit: Meninges and Vascular Anatomy courtesy of the Central Nervous System Visual Perspectives Project, Karolinska Institutet and Stanford University.
  • Sarpeshkar teams with researchers at the Lincoln Laboratory to develop an implantable fuel cell built that could power neural prosthetics that help patients regain control of limbs.
  • Area I: BioMedical Sciences and Engineering within EECS is composed of EECS faculty and students who work at the cutting edge of engineering and/or medicine. Our collective goal is to understand complex biological systems and/or engineer systems that solve important biological problems. Related: bioEECS

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