I - BioMedical Sciences & Engineering

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  • Detecting early-stage malarial infection of blood cells is a diagnostic that has recently come closer to reality through the work of MIT's Anantha Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head, and Subra Suresh, former MIT Dean of Engineering, now president of Carnegie Mellon University. The work, which has been published Aug. 8 in the journal Lab on a Chip, is potentially applicable to detecting other infections and diseases.
  • Mehmet Fatih Yanik, associate professor of electrical engineering and biological engineering at MIT and head of the High-Throughput Neurotechnology Group based in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) has created his life's work by combining his training in physics and engineering with his passion for understanding the complexities of the human nervous system and how to determine therapeutics for neurological disorders. Read more...
  • James Fujimoto, the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT has been selected for the 2014 IEEE Photonics Award. The award, which is sponsored by the IEEE Photonics Society, is given in recognition of outstanding achievements in photonics. Prof. Fujimoto is cited “for pioneering the development and commercialization of optical coherence tomography for medical diagnostics.”
  • Joel Voldman engineers cutting-edge approaches to stem cell signaling, point of care therapeutics, and neuroengineering. In the never-ending mega study of how biological systems work, Joel Voldman’s mission is to understand the most basic interactions between single cells. To achieve that, he applies the power of microfluidics to isolate the actions and behaviors of single cells and the interactions between cells.
  • In a paper they are presenting this summer at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference, EECS graduate student Guha Balakrishnan and his advisors, both faculty members in the MIT EECS Department, John Guttag and Fredo Durand, describe a new algorithm they developed to measure the heart rates of people in video. The algorithm allows for analyzing the digital data for small imperceptible movements that are caused by the rush of blood from the heart's contractions. Data could ultimately aid in predicting heart disease.
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, has teamed with colleagues to identify twelve chemicals which make it possible to grow liver tissue in a lab dish, making future liver tissue to treat many of the 500 million people suffering from chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C much closer to reality. Their work is reported in the June 2 issue of Nature Chemical Biology.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science faculty members and principal investigators in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) Tim Lu and Rahul Sarpeshkar have designed cells that exploit natural integral biochemical functions to make analog circuits to perform calculations and potentially act as pathogen sensors. The researchers, including lead author MIT postdoc Ramiz Daniel and microbiology graduate student Jacob Rubens have published their work in the May 15 online edition of Nature Biotechnology.
  • Collin Stultz, faculty member of both the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology and MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science has lead a recent study of one of the proteins associated with neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Using computational modeling, Stultz has proposed solutions to a controversy over the structure of alpha synuclein that could lead to development of new more effective treatments. Read more...
  • Professor Timothy K. Lu, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Biological Engineering at MIT is one of 16 young researchers selected by the Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR) as a Young Investigator. The ONR Young Investigator Prize (YIP) program is designed to attract young scientists and engineers who show exceptional promise for outstanding research and teaching careers. Read more...
  • Professor Peter Szolovits has been named the recipient of the 2013 Morris F. Collen Award of Excellence. The award is presented annually by the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) in honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field. According to the ACMI, the award is the "highest honor in informatics that is presented by the American College of Medical Informatics to an individual whose personal commitment and dedication to biomedical informatics has made a lasting impression on healthcare and biomedicine.”

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