I - BioMedical Sciences & Engineering

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  • In 2008, the World Health Organization announced a global effort to eradicate malaria, which kills about 800,000 people every year. As part of that goal, scientists are trying to develop new drugs that target the malaria parasite during the stage when it infects the human liver — crucial because some strains of malaria can lie dormant in the liver for several years before flaring up. Read more.
  • Five members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department of a total of eight MIT faculty have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering including Hari Balakrishnan, Sangeeta Bhatia, Anantha Chandrakasan, L. Rafael Reif and Daniela Rus. Read more.
  • Madrid-MIT M+Visión Team wins 2015 Singapore Challenge. Luca Giancardo, PhD and the neuroQWERTY team awarded $100,000 for the best proposal to help elderly to “Age in Place” with their technology. Read more.
  • Professor Joel Voldman, working with EECS graduate student Burak Dura and others from Whitehead Institute and Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new device that allows scientists to follow communication between immune cells. The work, reported in the Jan. 13 issue of Nature Communications, may lead to future studies of mechanisms that involve cancer and other diseases. Read more.
  • CSAIL postdoc and member of the MIT Computational Biology Group, Andreas Pfenning and collaborators at Duke University have reported findings on large data studies comparing song bird genomics with humans and primates. Vocal-learning birds and primates have common genes that could help pinpoint genetic disorders in humans such as stuttering or Huntington's Disease. Read more.
  • The Madrid-MIT M+Vision Consortium has been recognized by the Fundacion Tecnologia y Salud for accelerating health technology innovation. Dr Martha Gray (Harvard-MIT HST, EECS, RLE, IMES), M+Visión Director, accepted the award on behalf of the MIT members of the group. Read more.
  • EECS professor Ron Weiss has teamed with Mechanical Engineering professor Domitilla Del Vecchio and students from multiple departments at MIT to create a device that allows large biological circuits that behave with predictability nearly like that of electronic circuits. The work published this week in the journal Nature Biotechnology, has many applications -- particularly biosensing. Read more.
  • Prof. Sangeeta Bhatia, the John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology & Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT has been cited by Foreign Policy as one of its 100 Global Leading Thinkers specifically for her work in developing accessible diagnostics for colon cancer that would enable earlier detection. Read more.
  • Timothy Lu, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering has come up with a new reason to engineer E. coli — so that genomic memory can be both long-term and analog -- not just on or off. The work appears in the latest online issue of Science and in The Scientist magazine. Read more.
  • Five EECS faculty and associated researchers are among the 14 MIT research teams selected to receive Deshpande research grants for fall 2014. Initiated in 2002 through the MIT School of Engineering and made possible by a gift from Desh and Jaishree Deshpande, the Center’s mission is to move technologies from the laboratories at MIT to the marketplace. Read more.

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