Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

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  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandrakasan announced the appointment of Professor Albert Meyer as the new EECS Undergraduate Officer effective July 1, 2013. Prof. Meyer will take over from Professor Denny Freeman, who was recently chosen as the MIT Dean for Undergraduate Education.
  • Jouya Jadidian has been awarded the best student paper prize at IEEE PPPS 2013, the combined 19th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (PPC) and the 40th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) which was held June 2013 in San Francisco, CA, for the paper entitled, “Abrupt Changes in Streamer Propagation Velocity Driven by Electron Velocity Saturation and Microscopic Inhomogeneities.”
  • As noted on the CSAIL website: The Simons Foundation has announced that Professor Piotr Indyk has been selected as a Simons Investigator. Indyk is one of 13 mathematicians, theoretical physicists and computer scientists named as 2013 Simons Investigators and one of two professors at MIT selected for the honor. Read more
  • EECS Professors Regina Barzilay and Martin Rinard (and their respective graduate students Nate Kushman and Tao Lei) have demonstrated that ordinary language can be used (in specific cases) to aid in generating code for computer programs. Read more
  • Faculty members in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are converging on a wide range of research issues through game theory, which used to be a staple of economics research in the 1950s. EECS faculty members Asuman Ozdaglar, Costis Daskalakis, Munther Dahleh, and Silvio Micali discuss their approaches in this Technology Review feature. Read more.
  • Srini Devadas, the Edwin Sibley Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and members of the Computational Structures Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed a new system that not only disguises a server's memory-access patterns, but also prevents attacks that rely on how long computations take.
  • EECS faculty member Dina Katabi, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and her graduate student Fadel Adib have developed a system (dubbed Wi-Vi) which uses low-cost wireless technology to track moving humans behind walls.
  • In a paper they are presenting this summer at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference, EECS graduate student Guha Balakrishnan and his advisors, both faculty members in the MIT EECS Department, John Guttag and Fredo Durand, describe a new algorithm they developed to measure the heart rates of people in video. The algorithm allows for analyzing the digital data for small imperceptible movements that are caused by the rush of blood from the heart's contractions. Data could ultimately aid in predicting heart disease.

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