Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

SHARE:
  • Abstract: This talk will discuss high throughput nanomanufacturing enabled by inkjet based UV nanoimprint lithography with a focus on (i) Design and real-time control of nanopatterning systems; and (ii) Customized systems and processes for applications including CMOS memory, patterned media for hard disk drives, flexible nanoelectronics, and shape/size controlled nanocarriers for targeted diagnostics and drug delivery. Biography: S.V. Sreenivasan specializes in high throughput nanomanufacturing as applied to electronics, biomedicine, and energy. He is the John T. MacGuire professor of mechanical engineering at UT-Austin; and co-founder of Molecular Imprints, Inc., a world leader in imprint based nanolithography technology.
  • Quantum Dots: From MIT to Market QD Vision spun out of MIT in 2005, with a broad technology suite, a business plan, and Series A funding from top-notch Boston-based venture capitalists. Despite several twists and turns of technology development and market evolution, QD Vision announced in January that our quantum dot-enabled Color IQTM components will be in 2013 Sony TVs, the first mainstream product launch of a QD device. This talk will describe the pathway, and pitfalls, to this milestone.
  • At this year’s IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, students in the Learning and Intelligent Systems Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory will present a pair of papers showing how household robots could use a little lateral thinking to compensate for their physical shortcomings. EECS senior and SuperUROP student Annie Holladay has designed an algorithm that allows a robot to use both hands to avoid the bad, error-prone track so that it can successfully place an object in what might be up to a 16-dimensional space.
  • Researchers in the lab of Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering, including Rahul Rithe, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, have developed a chip which can perform professional quality enhancements of photographs quickly and without draining power on smartphone and digital cameras--cutting out the need for added energy- and time-consuming computational photography systems.
  • In a paper titled "Ampli fication of Chosen-Ciphertext Security," two CSAIL postdoctoral associates Huijia (Rachel) Lin and Stefano Tessaro, who work with EECS Professor Shafi Goldwasser, have proposed a new technique aimed at protecting against the worst possible scenario in current enryption scheme vulnerabilities. This work will be presented in May this spring at the International Conference on the Theory and Applications of Cryptographic Techniques.
  • Anant Agarwal, president of edX, the worldwide, online learning initiative of MIT and Harvard University and professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He is recognized “for contributions to shared-memory and multicore computer architectures.”
  • Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.

Pages

Subscribe to Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)