Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

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  • Professor Russ Tedrake and members of his research group, the Robot Locomotion Group, have tackled a difficult problem in robotics: how to mathematically allow for all instances of robot limbs touching (or striking) another surface in conjunction with free space motions. Tedrake and members of his group will be presenting their work in April at the Hybrid Systems: Computation and Control conference. The paper titled "A Direct Method for Trajectory Optimization of Rigid Bodies Through Contact" has been short listed for the best paper category.
  • Tuesday, November 26th, 2013, 34-101, @4:15pm. Refreshments @ 4:00pm.
  • The Royal Academy of Engineering has announced that Tim Berners-Lee, the 3COM Founders Professor of Engineering at MIT, has been named one of the winners of the inaugural Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering for his work in creating the World Wide Web. The award honored Berners-Lee, Marc Andreessen, Vinton Cerf, Robert Kahn and Louis Pouzin for "outstanding advances in engineering that have changed the world and benefited humanity.”
  • Professor Rob Miller is one of four MIT faculty selected as 2013 MacVicar Faculty Fellow for outstanding undergraduate teaching, mentoring and educational innovation. One recommender wrote: “I think Rob embodies the ideal of an MIT teacher — caring, engaging, tirelessly working on behalf of the students, eliciting respect, admiration, and joy from the students.”
  • MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali have won the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) A.M. Turing Award for their pioneering work in the fields of cryptography and complexity theory. Essentially laying the foundation for modern cryptography by formalizing the concept that cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute, the two have turned cryptography from an art into science -- and, in the process provided the basis for securing today's communications protocols, Internet transactions and cloud computing. They also made fundamental advances in the theory of computational complexity, an area that focuses on classifying computational problems according to their inherent difficulty.
  • Researchers working with EECS faculty member and CSAIL principal investigator Samuel Madden, are developing a new system called DBSeer to address the realities of cloud computing -- particularly database applications requiring over expenditure for hardware. In June, Professor Madden and members of the MIT Database Group including first author of two papers on this work, postdoctoral associate Barzan Mozafari will present their work at the annual meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Management of Data (SIGMOD).
  • In a "fireside" chat forum, Wireless@MIT co-directors and professors in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, Dina Katabi and Hari Balakrishnan discussed spectrum and wireless policies with US Federal Communications Commission head Julius Genachowski at the Kirsch Auditorium in the Stata Center, Thursday, March 7, 2013.
  • On Wednesday, March 6 at 4:00 PM, Julius Genachowski, Chairman of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will answer questions about wireless spectrum - including spectrum sharing, spectrum access and allocation, and the impact of the spectrum crunch on the wireless industry - during a Fireside Chat with Professor Hari Balakrishnan and Professor Dina Katabi, co-directors of the MIT Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Stata Center, Kirsch Auditorium, 32-123.
  • "In our heads it's like a big world of small motions out there." Bill Freeman, professor of electrical engineering and computer science and associate department head of the Electrical Engineeering and Computer Science Department at MIT describes in a NY Times video his software that enables video magification to see what we can't normally see but might like to.
  • Erik Demaine, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the MIT EECS Department and principal investigator in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), has been honored with the 2013 European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS) Presburger Award for young scientists. Prof. Demaine was selected for his “outstanding contributions in several fields of algorithms, namely computational geometry, data structures, graph algorithms and recreational algorithms,” according to the EATCS website. “His work has shown promising applications to computer graphics, sensor networks, molecular biology, programmable matter, and manufacturing and engineering.”

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