Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

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  • At this year’s IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, students in the Learning and Intelligent Systems Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory will present a pair of papers showing how household robots could use a little lateral thinking to compensate for their physical shortcomings. EECS senior and SuperUROP student Annie Holladay has designed an algorithm that allows a robot to use both hands to avoid the bad, error-prone track so that it can successfully place an object in what might be up to a 16-dimensional space.
  • Researchers in the lab of Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering, including Rahul Rithe, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, have developed a chip which can perform professional quality enhancements of photographs quickly and without draining power on smartphone and digital cameras--cutting out the need for added energy- and time-consuming computational photography systems.
  • In a paper titled "Ampli fication of Chosen-Ciphertext Security," two CSAIL postdoctoral associates Huijia (Rachel) Lin and Stefano Tessaro, who work with EECS Professor Shafi Goldwasser, have proposed a new technique aimed at protecting against the worst possible scenario in current enryption scheme vulnerabilities. This work will be presented in May this spring at the International Conference on the Theory and Applications of Cryptographic Techniques.
  • Anant Agarwal, president of edX, the worldwide, online learning initiative of MIT and Harvard University and professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He is recognized “for contributions to shared-memory and multicore computer architectures.”
  • Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.
  • With the fall 2012 launch of the bigdata@csail center, which represents a focused effort to understand and put to good use the huge amounts of data generated all the time, a handful of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are contributing specifically to medical applications. The MIT News Office has featured the work of Peter Szolovits, John Guttag, Alan Willsky and -- perhaps at the heart of abstractly looking at big data and medicine -- former EECS undergraduate and masters degree student David Rashef, now an MD/PhD student with the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology (HST) program. Read more...
  • In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.

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