Cybersecurity

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  • MIT EECS faculty members in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab CSAIL Frans Kaashoek, Nickolai Zeldovich and Armando Solar-Lezama along with EECS graduate student Xi Wang have created a system they call Stack which will automatically scan programmer's code to avoid compilers from tossing bits of code that might not appear essential. Read more.
  • Dina Katabi, professor in the MIT EECS Department, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and co-director of Wireless@MIT has been selected as a 2013 MacArthur Fellow. She is cited by the MacArthur Fellows Program for her work "at the interface of computer science and electrical engineering to improve the speed, reliability, and security of data exchange. Katabi has contributed to a range of networking issues, from protocols to minimize congestion in high-bandwidth networks to algorithms for spectrum analysis, though most of her work centers on wireless data transmission."
  • EECS graduate students Alessandro Chiesa and Madars Virza have teamed to develop a new system which can detect tampering in the cloud. The team presented their system, which is described as a practical, succinct zero-knowledge proof for arbitrary programs, at the International Cryptology Conference in August. Read more
  • Researchers from CSAIL and Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing have developed a TCP congestion-control system called Remy, which they will present at the annual conference of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Data Communications. Hari Balakrishnan, the Fujitsu Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and EECS graduate student Keith Winstein are the authors of the work titled "TCP ex Machina: Computer-Generated Congestion Control".
  • EECS Professors Regina Barzilay and Martin Rinard (and their respective graduate students Nate Kushman and Tao Lei) have demonstrated that ordinary language can be used (in specific cases) to aid in generating code for computer programs. Read more
  • Faculty members in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are converging on a wide range of research issues through game theory, which used to be a staple of economics research in the 1950s. EECS faculty members Asuman Ozdaglar, Costis Daskalakis, Munther Dahleh, and Silvio Micali discuss their approaches in this Technology Review feature. Read more.
  • Srini Devadas, the Edwin Sibley Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and members of the Computational Structures Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed a new system that not only disguises a server's memory-access patterns, but also prevents attacks that rely on how long computations take.
  • EECS faculty member Dina Katabi, principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and her graduate student Fadel Adib have developed a system (dubbed Wi-Vi) which uses low-cost wireless technology to track moving humans behind walls.
  • EECS faculty members Shafi Goldwasser, and Nickolai Zeldovich, both members of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT, and EECS graduate student Raluca Ada Popa have teamed with colleagues at University of Toronto and Microsoft Research to report a development in the area of homomorphic encryption that offers a functional encryption scheme to maintain security of encrypted data in the cloud.

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