Robotics

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  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!
  • The MIT News Office has featured Russ Tedrake, the X Consortium Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. From his beginnings -- not in computer science -- to his discovery, as an undergraduate, of computer programming as a means to achieve his passion to build things, Russ Tedrake has carved a path as a unique roboticist.
  • A new flexible robot that moves like an earthworm, called "Mesworm," has been devised by researchers from Harvard University, Seoul National University and MIT including EECS professor Daniela Rus, director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL). The robot, designed to stand up to tortuous conditions and still keep on moving in its earthworm-like manner, may prove useful under hazardous conditions that are tight and/or unreachable.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department PhD candidate Alec Rivers, working with EECS Associate Professor Fredo Durand and MIT Mechanical Engineering Department PhD candidate Ilan Moyer will be presenting a new digitally driven method for creating precise shapes with minimal human guidance at this week's Siggraph conference in Los Angeles.
  • With the goal of developing an aircraft that can fly like a bird, quickly darting around fixed and moving objects, EECS Associate Professor Russ Tedrake as lead of a five-year multi-research initiative, has created a new autonomous flying aircraft that is coming very close to this reality. This work, carried out in Tedrake's lab by his group, the Robot Locomotion Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) is featured on the CSAIL website.
  • Academic programs for graduate students in the field of computer science lead to the Master of Engineering, Master of Science, Engineer's, and either Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Science degree. 

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