Research

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  • At this year’s Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications (OOPSLA) conference, EECS faculty member Martin Rinard and several students from his group in MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory presented a new system that lets programmers identify sections of their code that can tolerate inconsequential error. The system, dubbed Chisel, then determines which program instructions to assign to unreliable hardware components, to maximize energy savings yet still meet the programmers’ accuracy requirements. Read more.
  • Professor Muriel Medard working with EECS graduate student Flavio du Pin Calmon and researchers from Maynooth University in Ireland have shown that since existing practical cryptographic schemes demonstrate elements of information-theoretic security thereby preventing extraction of some of their data — it is possible to calculate minimum-security guarantees for any given encryption scheme — enabling information managers to make more informed decisions about how to protect data. Read more.
  • Rodney Brooks, Founder, Chairman, CTO of Rethink Robotics and Panasonic Professor of Robotics (emeritus) at MIT, has spent his life creating intelligent machines that do our bidding. Read more about him and why he fears there will not be enough workforce robots in the future.
  • Five EECS faculty and associated researchers are among the 14 MIT research teams selected to receive Deshpande research grants for fall 2014. Initiated in 2002 through the MIT School of Engineering and made possible by a gift from Desh and Jaishree Deshpande, the Center’s mission is to move technologies from the laboratories at MIT to the marketplace. Read more.
  • Using Bayesian regression, Devavrat Shah, member of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (LIDS) and recent graduate student Kang Zhang have identified patterns from five months of price data from all major Bitcoin exhanges — enabling them to predict the price of Bitcoin — thereby allowing them to double their investment over a 50 day period. Read more.
  • Karl K. Berggren, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in MIT's EECS department and member of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) and the Research Lab of Electronics (RLE) and EECS graduate student Adam McCaughan have devised the Nanocryotron — the Ntron for shor — a new approach to a 1950s design, that now shows promise for use in superconducting computer chips at 50 - 100 times energy efficiency and greater processing power. Read more.
  • Three 2014-2015 Faculty Research Innovation Fellowships (FRIF) were announced on Oct. 7. 2014. The FRIF was established in 2011 to recognize mid-career EECS faculty members for outstanding research contributions and international leadership in their fields. Read more.
  • Yesterday, Oc.t 8, 2014, Advanced Micro Devices, one of the world's biggest chip-design companies appointed Lisa Su, '91 SB, SM and '94 PhD, as its president and chief executive officer. She is the first female to head the 45 year old company and the latest female top executive at a major Silicon Valley tech company. Read more.
  • Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) research scientist Luis Fernando Velásquez-García and his group have devised a new way for manufacturing nanoscale devices cheaply using arrays of carbon nanotubes. Their work, published in the IEEE Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, promises a wide range of applications. read more
  • Mehmet Fatih Yanik has teamed to create a drug delivery pipeline using nanoparticles — enabling rapid testing in zebrafish for eventual delivery to human subjects of biologics, including antibodies, peptides, RNA and DNA. Read more.
  • In a two pronged attack on the killer superbugs that have become nearly unstoppable, Tim Lu, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and principal investigator in MIT's Research Lab of Electronics, has not only developed a gene editing system that can selectively kill the bacteria carrying harmful genes that confer antibiotic resistance or cause disease, but also devised a way of identifying combinations of genes that work together to make bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics. Read more.
  • Institute professor Mildred Dresselhaus has teamed with fellow researchers in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and from MIT's Physics Department and Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) to identify a promising light source for optoelectronic chips that can be tuned to different frequencies — crucial to realizing the full potential of moving data with far greater energy efficiency. Read more.
  • Li-Shiuan Peh, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the EECS Department at MIT has teamed to develop a new system that directs drivers using GPS to avoid traffic congestion. The work won the group one of the best-paper awards at the Intelligent Transportation Systems World Congress last week. Read more.
  • Dirk Englund, assistant professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT and head of the Quantum Photonics Group, collaborates with the experts and instruments at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials to explore the quantum landscape. Read more
  • Dimitri Antoniadis was presented the 2014 Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) Aristotle Award at the annual SRC TECHCON conference on Sept. 8 in Austin, Texas. He Is cited by the SRC for outstanding teaching and a deep commitment to the educational experience of his graduate students and for pioneering research in nanoscale solid-state electronic devices involving the application of new materials systems and structures to transistors for deeply scaled electronics. Read more.
  • Principal investigator in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab Charles E. Leiserson is the recipient of the ACM/IEEE Computer Society 2014 Ken Kennedy Award, in recognition of his important impact on parallel computing systems. Read more.
  • Cited for her work as doctor, engineer and scientist to design nano and micro technologies that pioneer new ways to understand and fight disease, Sangeeta N. Bhatia, the John J. (1929) and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) has been awarded the Lemelson-MIT Prize. Read more.
  • A research team from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology including Jongyoon Han, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, has developed a new way to diagnose malaria using magnetic resonance relaxometry (MRR) — a technology that the group is adapting for inexpensive field deployable usage. Read more.
  • Professor Ruonan Han joined the EECS department at MIT as an assistant professor in July 2014. As a principal investigator with the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL), Han will pursue work in ultra-high-speed circuits and systems. His research group, the Terahertz Integrated Electronics Group aims to explore microelectronic technologies to bridge the terahertz gap between microwave and infrared domains. Read more.
  • Getting to the source of data-visualization aberrations is a big problem in big data. EECS doctoral student Eugene Wu with Sam Madden, professor of computer science and engineering in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have released a new tool, called DBWipes, that pinpoints aberrations and determines which data sources to investigate. Read more.
  • A team led by Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) researchers including EECS associate professor Wojciech Matusik and project lead and doctoral candidate Adriana Schulz has developed “Fab By Example,” the first data-driven method to help people design products, with a growing database of templates that allow users to customize thousands of complex items — without the need to understand the mechanical engineering that might normally be expected. The team will be presenting its system at this month’s Siggraph graphics conference. Read more.
  • Researchers at MIT -- including EECS graduate student Abe Davis and EECS faculty members Fredo Durand and Bill Freeman, and members of the Computer Graphics Group in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have collaborated with colleagues at Microsoft and Adobe to develop an algorithm to reconstruct an audio signal produced by practically invisible vibrations of objects filmed in video and normally inaudible to human hearing. Read more.
  • Paying attention to the data that says MOOC learning is limited because of high drop rates and other negatives, CSAIL researchers have noted that students need help learning how to watch the videos and these researchers have developed a new way for students to learn how to watch MOOC videos called LectureScape. Read more.
  • EECS faculty members Hari Balakrishnan and Devavrat Shah with EECS graduate students Jonathan Perry, and Amy Ousterhout, and Hans Fugal of Facebook have devised a new system to reduce delay time in data center queues. Using Fastpass, the name given to the new system, the group has experimentally reduced the average queue length of routers by as much as 99.6 percent in a Facebook data center. Read more.
  • Light is everything to good photography. Knowing this fact well, EECS professor Fredo Durand, also an experienced photographer, has begun to create a new system that uses drones (light-equipped autonomous robots) to create accurate lighting while communicating with the camera-mounted interface. Durand and several other researchers will report on their work at an upcoming international symposium in August.