Research

SHARE:
  • In a paper they are presenting this summer at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference, EECS graduate student Guha Balakrishnan and his advisors, both faculty members in the MIT EECS Department, John Guttag and Fredo Durand, describe a new algorithm they developed to measure the heart rates of people in video. The algorithm allows for analyzing the digital data for small imperceptible movements that are caused by the rush of blood from the heart's contractions. Data could ultimately aid in predicting heart disease.
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, has teamed with colleagues to identify twelve chemicals which make it possible to grow liver tissue in a lab dish, making future liver tissue to treat many of the 500 million people suffering from chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C much closer to reality. Their work is reported in the June 2 issue of Nature Chemical Biology.
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science faculty members and principal investigators in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) Tim Lu and Rahul Sarpeshkar have designed cells that exploit natural integral biochemical functions to make analog circuits to perform calculations and potentially act as pathogen sensors. The researchers, including lead author MIT postdoc Ramiz Daniel and microbiology graduate student Jacob Rubens have published their work in the May 15 online edition of Nature Biotechnology.
  • Collin Stultz, faculty member of both the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology and MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science has lead a recent study of one of the proteins associated with neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Using computational modeling, Stultz has proposed solutions to a controversy over the structure of alpha synuclein that could lead to development of new more effective treatments. Read more...
  • Professor Timothy K. Lu, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Biological Engineering at MIT is one of 16 young researchers selected by the Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR) as a Young Investigator. The ONR Young Investigator Prize (YIP) program is designed to attract young scientists and engineers who show exceptional promise for outstanding research and teaching careers. Read more...
  • Professor Peter Szolovits has been named the recipient of the 2013 Morris F. Collen Award of Excellence. The award is presented annually by the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) in honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field. According to the ACMI, the award is the "highest honor in informatics that is presented by the American College of Medical Informatics to an individual whose personal commitment and dedication to biomedical informatics has made a lasting impression on healthcare and biomedicine.”
  • Abstract: This talk will discuss high throughput nanomanufacturing enabled by inkjet based UV nanoimprint lithography with a focus on (i) Design and real-time control of nanopatterning systems; and (ii) Customized systems and processes for applications including CMOS memory, patterned media for hard disk drives, flexible nanoelectronics, and shape/size controlled nanocarriers for targeted diagnostics and drug delivery. Biography: S.V. Sreenivasan specializes in high throughput nanomanufacturing as applied to electronics, biomedicine, and energy. He is the John T. MacGuire professor of mechanical engineering at UT-Austin; and co-founder of Molecular Imprints, Inc., a world leader in imprint based nanolithography technology.
  • Researchers at the High Throughput Neurotechnology Group in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) have built an automated system that can rapidly produce 3-D, micron-resolution images of thousands of zebrafish larvae and precisely analyze their physical traits. The system, described in the Feb. 12 edition of Nature Communications, offers a comprehensive view of how potential drugs affect vertebrates, says Professor Mehmet Fatih Yanik, senior author of the paper.
  • Timothy Lu, MIT assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering working with members of the Synthetic Biology Group in the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has successfully created new synthetic biology circuits that combine memory and logic allowing potential control over production of cells to generate biofuels, drugs or other useful compounds. Read more...
  • With the recent launch of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, the MIT News Office provided an Institute-wide look at the ongoing medical research including the work of Sangeeta Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and of Health Sciences and Technology.
  • Gregory Wornell, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) has teamed with former RLE member Dr. Maryam Shanechi, who has recently earned her doctorate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, Prof. Emery Brown of the Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department at MIT, and neurosurgeon Dr. Ziv Williams at Massachusetts General Hospital to develop the first instance of an "intelligent" Brain-Motor Interface, which uses specially designed advanced neural decoding algorithms to decode in advance a sequence of planned movements from neural activity in the premotor cortex.
  • Anantha Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head, and two of his students in the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) have joined a team of researchers from the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) to show that a natural battery in the mammalian inner ear can power an implantable electronic device. Read more...
  • CSAIL researchers and members of the Clinical Decision Making Group including the group's director Peter Szolovits, professor of computer science and engineering and postdoctoral researcher Anna Rumshisky have developed a new system for disambiguating (distinguishing between several meanings) the senses of words used in doctors’ clinical notes. Read more...
  • The MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department held a reception, October 18, to celebrate the official launch of the new SuperUROP undergraduate research program. Members of the inaugural class of the SuperUROP program, sponsors (and donors), MIT administrators who contributed to its implementation, and EECS faculty mentors and guests, joined EECS Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan in the Stata Center R&D Dining area to celebrate. Read more and view photos of the event and the 6.UAR class held just before the reception.
  • Calling it a glimpse into the future, technology news website CRN has hailed MIT EECS/CSAIL faculty and the new Wireless@MIT center as the source for seven new technologies that will impact (favorably) our daily lives. Read more...
  • As reported by the Champalimaud Foundation, the 2012 António Champalimaud Vision Award was given to several researchers including Professor James G. Fujimoto, Research Laboratory of Electronics affiliate Eric A. Swanson for the creation and development of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Fujimoto, the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering, Swanson, and their collaborators were recognized for the major role that OCT now plays in the diagnosis and treatment of the most important blinding diseases of the industrialized world: macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Currently, it is estimated that more than 40 million OCT diagnostic procedures are performed worldwide annually.
  • David Gifford, EECS professor and director of the Computational Genomics Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), working with members of his group, has developed a new algorithm for analyzing millions of experimentally identified DNA fragments and allowing the inference -- with 55% accuracy in the most difficult cases -- of the precise locations at which transcription factors bind to them. Read more!
  • This fall, the faculty and students in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at MIT are coming together for a new program that has created a buzz since its announcement last spring. The Advanced Undergraduate Research Program — now officially called the SuperUROP — for EECS department juniors and seniors has already enticed over 200 students with more than 100 exciting research projects proposed by the department's faculty. Read more!
  • Polina Golland, associate professor in the MIT EECS department and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), working with EECS graduate student Archana Venkataraman has developed an algorithm which can aid in deciphering what regions of the brain are involved in certain diseases ultimately enabling drug companies to develop more effective treatments for the disease that specifically target these regions.
  • Anantha P. Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head and the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT has been selected as the winner of the 2013 IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits. The citation for the award reads "For pioneering techniques in low-power digital and analog CMOS design."
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a member of the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, has teamed with researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute, to develop an RNA-delivering nanoparticle system that allows clinical targeting to arrive at effective drug treatments.
  • Tim Lu, assistant professor of electrical engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, principal investigator in the Research Lab of Electronics at MIT, and Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has been working with colleagues at Boston University (BU), Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to build genetic circuit components in living cells to ultimately perform novel functions such as manufacturing new drugs, producing fuel, or even programming suicide of cancer cells.
  • Timothy K. Lu, EECS assistant professor and principal investigator with the MIT Research Lab of Electronics, RLE, is one of five MIT members selected for the presidential early career award for Scientists and Engineers - and one of 96 selected for this honor nationwide. Lu is cited for his contributions in establishing innovative synthetic biology platforms and for his pioneering applications of synthetic biology to materials science, nanotechnology and infectious diseases.
  • James Fujimoto has been appointed as the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering for a five-year term from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017.