Research

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  • RLE reinterprets "electronics" for the 21st century, from the basic physical realm of particles and quantum physics, up to sophisticated engineering technologies in use today and critical to tomorrow.

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  • Professor Qing Hu and graduate students in his research group, the Millimeter-wave and Terahertz Devices Group in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and researchers from several outside research labs have published their breakthrough research on terahertz laser frequency combs, and are featured as the cover story of the June 2014 issue of Nature Photonics (June 2014, Volume 8 No 6). This research has applications from cancer detection to explosives sensing. Read more about this research on the RLE website.
  • Working with members of the Quantum Photonics Laboratory (QPL) under the direction of EECS assistant professor Dirk Englund, principal author Hannah Clevenson, EECS graduate student and Pierre Desjardins and Xuetao Gan have developed an optical gas sensor that provides an extremely sensitive and compact way to detect very small amounts of target molecules of gas before they disperse. Read more.
  • Vladimir Bulovic, the Fariborz Maseeh Professor of Emerging Technology and associate dean for innovation in MIT’s School of Engineering, with MIT professor of chemistry Moungi Bawendi and graduate students Chia-Hao Chuang and Patrick Brown have developed new quantum dot photovoltaic cells that demonstrate significant efficiency in solar cells with no need for high temperature or vacuum conditions to operate -- or to be produced. Read more.
  • Marc Baldo, MIT professor of electrical engineering has teamed with MIT’s Troy Van Voorhis, professor of chemistry and other researchers to understand the theory behind singlet excitonic fission -- a process by which extra electrons are produced by incoming photonic energy -- first observed in the 1960s. This new understanding of what materials will generate this added energy has potential for creating solar cells that demonstratew up to 25 per cent increased efficiency. Read more.
  • An MIT team whose integrated chip restores lost power to partially shaded solar panels — achieving double the energy capture improvement of similar technologies — won big on Monday night at the seventh annual MIT Clean Energy Prize (CEP) competition. Five of the six members of Unified Solar, the winning team, in this high profile competition, are graduate students in the laboratory of EECS Professor Steeve Leeb. Read more.
  • Prof. Steven B. Leeb met with Sharon Burke, assistant secretary of Defense for Operational Energy Plans and Programs, about the non-intrusive load monitor developed at MIT, during Burke's visit to the Army Base Camp Integration Laboratory at Fort Devens, Mass. The monitor can look at an energy grid and break down energy use by individual devices plugged into a system. Read more.
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and head of the Analog Circuits and Biological Systems Group in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) is featured by the Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) at MIT for his work that blends both biological (wet) and electronic analog circuits (dry) in research that could lead to newly engineered immune cells that could detect cancer cells and kill them, for example. Read more.
  • Muriel Médard, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the MIT EECS Department and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT, has been awarded, with co-authors Josu Bilbao, Aitor Calvo, Igor Armendariz, and Pedro Crespo, the Best Paper Award for their work “Reliable Communications with Network coding in narrowband Powerline Channel.” They presented this work at the IEEE International Symposium on Power Line Communications and its Applications (ISPLC 2014) in Glasgow in March. Read more.
  • Until now the theoretical and much studied quasiparticle known as the exciton — responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits — has never been observed in action. Now researchers in the Center for EXcitonics in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT including EECS professors Marc Baldo and Vladimir Bulovic, and investigators at the City College of New York have imaged excitons' motions directly. Read more.
  • Muriel Médard has been appointed as the Cecil H. Green Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. In announcing this appointment, Department Head Anantha Chandrakasan shared the following message with his EECS colleagues. Read more.
  • Dennis Freeman, professor of electrical engineering, and a team of researchers in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics has reported findings in the Biophysical Journal that our selective ability to distinguish sounds depends on the size and distribution of pores just a few nanometers wide in the inner ear's tectorial membrane. The work may ultimately lead to biochemical manipulation or other means to aid in improving hearing. Read more.
  • Ljubisa Stevanovic, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 34-401
  • Timothy K. Lu, Assistant Professor leading the Synthetic Biology Group in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Department of Biological Engineering and principal investigator in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has been selected for a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in support of work to understand biological cells as state machines leading to insights into natural biological systems and synthetic gene circuits. Read more.
  • Jeffrey H. Shapiro has been elected to the grade of Fellow of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics. SPIE was founded in 1955 to advance light-based technologies. Shapiro, the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department is also a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the IEEE, the Institute of Physics, and the Optical Society of America. Read more.
  • Prof. Mildred Dresselhaus, Institute professor emerita and faculty member in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Physics Departments, received the Materials Research Society Von Hippel Award in recognition of her work and close association with Prof. Von Hippel. Read more.
  • Under the direction of EECS professor Jeffrey Shapiro, and senior research scientist Franco Wong - both members of the Research Laboratory of Electronic's (RLE) Optical and Quantum Communications Group and of Vivek Goyal, RLE research scientist and head of the Signal Transformation and Information Representation Group, EECS doctoral student Ahmed Kirmani, working under Goyal, has developed a computational imager that uses one photon per pixel allowing laser rangefinders to infer depth (3D) from a hundredth as much light and produce images from one 900th the light needed. Read more.
  • "There's a very strong need for that computer to turn electrical signals into optical signals very efficiently," Dirk Englund the Jamieson Career Development Assistant Professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department explained to Marketplace Tech. Englund was approached to discuss his work in the Quantum Photonics Laboratory, where computer chips made of graphene and silicon are encouraging information to move near the speed of light. Read more.
  • Along with 9 other finalists, EECS graduate student Cody Gilleland presented his dream research proposal in April to Regeneron. He was named inaugural recipient, based on his presentation to essentially bring Moore's law to early stage drug delivery by designing a new system for developing and validating drug targets (prior to mouse model trials).
  • Timothy Lu, assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department with EECS graduate student Samuel Perli and Fahim Farzadfard, MIT Biology Department graduate student have developed a technique that can turn genes on or off inside yeast and human cells -- a potential window on understanding the function of those genes and also leading to engineering genes that could perform useful functions. Read more.
  • Muriel Médard, professor of electrical engineering in the MIT EECS Department and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and EECS graduate student Falvio du Pin Calmon have teamed with researchers at the National University of Ireland to demonstrate that the security of many keyless-entry systems may not be as secure as previously thought. Médard and the NUI team will present their work at the Asilomar Conference on Signals and Systems in September.
  • Mehmet Fatih Yanik, associate professor of electrical engineering and biological engineering at MIT and head of the High-Throughput Neurotechnology Group based in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) has created his life's work by combining his training in physics and engineering with his passion for understanding the complexities of the human nervous system and how to determine therapeutics for neurological disorders. Read more...
  • James Fujimoto, the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT has been selected for the 2014 IEEE Photonics Award. The award, which is sponsored by the IEEE Photonics Society, is given in recognition of outstanding achievements in photonics. Prof. Fujimoto is cited “for pioneering the development and commercialization of optical coherence tomography for medical diagnostics.”
  • Dept. Head Anantha Chandraksan has announced the appointment of Prof. Jeffrey H. Lang to the Vitesse Professorship in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, effective July 1, 2013. The Vitesse Chair was established in 2000 to honor the Vitesse Semiconductor Corporation, a company co-founded in 1984 by former MIT students.