Research

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  • MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali have won the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) A.M. Turing Award for their pioneering work in the fields of cryptography and complexity theory. Essentially laying the foundation for modern cryptography by formalizing the concept that cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute, the two have turned cryptography from an art into science -- and, in the process provided the basis for securing today's communications protocols, Internet transactions and cloud computing. They also made fundamental advances in the theory of computational complexity, an area that focuses on classifying computational problems according to their inherent difficulty.
  • Researchers working with EECS faculty member and CSAIL principal investigator Samuel Madden, are developing a new system called DBSeer to address the realities of cloud computing -- particularly database applications requiring over expenditure for hardware. In June, Professor Madden and members of the MIT Database Group including first author of two papers on this work, postdoctoral associate Barzan Mozafari will present their work at the annual meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Management of Data (SIGMOD).
  • Abstract: This talk will discuss high throughput nanomanufacturing enabled by inkjet based UV nanoimprint lithography with a focus on (i) Design and real-time control of nanopatterning systems; and (ii) Customized systems and processes for applications including CMOS memory, patterned media for hard disk drives, flexible nanoelectronics, and shape/size controlled nanocarriers for targeted diagnostics and drug delivery. Biography: S.V. Sreenivasan specializes in high throughput nanomanufacturing as applied to electronics, biomedicine, and energy. He is the John T. MacGuire professor of mechanical engineering at UT-Austin; and co-founder of Molecular Imprints, Inc., a world leader in imprint based nanolithography technology.
  • In a "fireside" chat forum, Wireless@MIT co-directors and professors in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, Dina Katabi and Hari Balakrishnan discussed spectrum and wireless policies with US Federal Communications Commission head Julius Genachowski at the Kirsch Auditorium in the Stata Center, Thursday, March 7, 2013.
  • Quantum Dots: From MIT to Market QD Vision spun out of MIT in 2005, with a broad technology suite, a business plan, and Series A funding from top-notch Boston-based venture capitalists. Despite several twists and turns of technology development and market evolution, QD Vision announced in January that our quantum dot-enabled Color IQTM components will be in 2013 Sony TVs, the first mainstream product launch of a QD device. This talk will describe the pathway, and pitfalls, to this milestone.
  • On Wednesday, March 6 at 4:00 PM, Julius Genachowski, Chairman of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will answer questions about wireless spectrum - including spectrum sharing, spectrum access and allocation, and the impact of the spectrum crunch on the wireless industry - during a Fireside Chat with Professor Hari Balakrishnan and Professor Dina Katabi, co-directors of the MIT Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Stata Center, Kirsch Auditorium, 32-123.
  • "In our heads it's like a big world of small motions out there." Bill Freeman, professor of electrical engineering and computer science and associate department head of the Electrical Engineeering and Computer Science Department at MIT describes in a NY Times video his software that enables video magification to see what we can't normally see but might like to.
  • Erik Demaine, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the MIT EECS Department and principal investigator in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), has been honored with the 2013 European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS) Presburger Award for young scientists. Prof. Demaine was selected for his “outstanding contributions in several fields of algorithms, namely computational geometry, data structures, graph algorithms and recreational algorithms,” according to the EATCS website. “His work has shown promising applications to computer graphics, sensor networks, molecular biology, programmable matter, and manufacturing and engineering.”
  • At this year’s IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, students in the Learning and Intelligent Systems Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory will present a pair of papers showing how household robots could use a little lateral thinking to compensate for their physical shortcomings. EECS senior and SuperUROP student Annie Holladay has designed an algorithm that allows a robot to use both hands to avoid the bad, error-prone track so that it can successfully place an object in what might be up to a 16-dimensional space.
  • Researchers in the lab of Anantha Chandrakasan, the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering, including Rahul Rithe, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, have developed a chip which can perform professional quality enhancements of photographs quickly and without draining power on smartphone and digital cameras--cutting out the need for added energy- and time-consuming computational photography systems.
  • In a paper titled "Ampli fication of Chosen-Ciphertext Security," two CSAIL postdoctoral associates Huijia (Rachel) Lin and Stefano Tessaro, who work with EECS Professor Shafi Goldwasser, have proposed a new technique aimed at protecting against the worst possible scenario in current enryption scheme vulnerabilities. This work will be presented in May this spring at the International Conference on the Theory and Applications of Cryptographic Techniques.
  • Anant Agarwal, president of edX, the worldwide, online learning initiative of MIT and Harvard University and professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He is recognized “for contributions to shared-memory and multicore computer architectures.”
  • Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.
  • With the fall 2012 launch of the bigdata@csail center, which represents a focused effort to understand and put to good use the huge amounts of data generated all the time, a handful of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are contributing specifically to medical applications. The MIT News Office has featured the work of Peter Szolovits, John Guttag, Alan Willsky and -- perhaps at the heart of abstractly looking at big data and medicine -- former EECS undergraduate and masters degree student David Rashef, now an MD/PhD student with the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology (HST) program. Read more...
  • In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.
  • In 2002 MIT Laboratory for Computer Science researchers Karen Sollins and David Clark (along with co-authors John Wroclawski and Bob Braden, with the USC Information Sciences Institute) published and presented a paper to an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) SIGCOMM conference titled "Tussle in Cyberspace: Defining Tomorrow's Internet." Due to the enduring nature of their discussion and the fact the paper was shared with an ACM conference, it is now being recognized with the ACM's Test of Time award ten years later.
  • Electrical engineering and computer science graduate student Bernhard Haeupler, student of MIT EECS Department faculty Muriel Medard, and David Karger, won one of two best student paper awards at the ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms this month for his work creating a reliable algorithm that delivers messages in decentralized networks, that have unknown shapes. By making this algorithm deterministic - rather than probalistic - the message will reach all nodes, guaranteeing delivery. [Graphic courtesy of Christine Daniloff, MIT News Office.]
  • In an effort to bring a more human dimension to the online education experience, MIT Professor Rob Miller and EECS graduate students Mason Tang and Elena Tatarchenko have developed a new computer system that will help provide students with feedback on their homework assignments and create more interaction between students, teachers, and alumni.
  • EECS Prof. Hal Abelson is making waves with his work developing the new Center for Mobile Learning at MIT and a new program called App Inventor, which is designed to allow individuals with no programming background the opportunity to create mobile applications. The Center, which is led by Abelson, Professor Eric Klopfer and Professor Mitchel Resnick, is dedicated to putting mobile technology into the hands of children as a vehicle for learning.
  • The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) has elected EECS professors Rodney Brooks and David Perreault to IEEE Fellow status. Professors Brooks and Perreault are among a class of 297 selected for the class of 2013 IEEE Fellows.
  • EECS faculty member Erik Demaine, professor of computer science at MIT, and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with members of the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms to develop a new kind of robotic device that mimics nature's folding of proteins to allow for all kinds of possible functionality.
  • The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT has announced that the recipients of the Faculty Research and Innovation Fellowship (FRIF) for 2012 are Fredo Durand, Piotr Indyk and Pablo Parrilo.
  • Read the Nov. 16, 2012 MIT News Office article by Larry Hardesty titled "Department snapshot: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.EECS places renewed emphasis on interdisciplinary research, partnerships with alumni and industry, and experiential learning," includes a visual glimpse of the EECS Department as well.
  • In the effort to handle data overload, Daniela Rus, professor of computer science MIT and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with postdoctoral associate Daniel Feldman to describe a novel way to represent data so that it takes up much less space in memory but can still be processed in conventional ways when needed.
  • Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston, who earned his undergraduate degree in computer science at MIT in 2005 and teamed with then EECS undergraduate student Arash Ferdowsi to found the company, will be the MIT June 7, 2013 Commencement speaker. "I’ve had some of the most formative experiences of my life at MIT,” Houston says. “It’s where Dropbox started and where I met my co-founder, Arash, so it’s an honor to come back and share my story. Technology is at the heart of how we shape our future and confront our challenges, and more than ever the world needs MIT graduates to lead us forward.”