Drones that drive

Photo: Brandon Araki |CSAIL

 

Rachel Gordon | CSAIL

Being able to both walk and take flight is typical in nature — many birds, insects, and other animals can do both. If we could program robots with similar versatility, it would open up many possibilities: Imagine machines that could fly into construction areas or disaster zones that aren’t near roads and then squeeze through tight spaces on the ground to transport objects or rescue people.

Computational origami

Image: Christine Daniloff/MIT

 

By Larry Hardesty | MIT News

In a 1999 paper, Erik Demaine — now an MIT professor of electrical engineering and computer science, but then an 18-year-old PhD student at the University of Waterloo, in Canada — described an algorithm that could determine how to fold a piece of paper into any conceivable 3-D shape.

Pages

Subscribe to MIT EECS RSS