Solar cells with exciton fission

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Solar cells with exciton fission

Faculty Advisor: Marc Baldo
Mentor(s): Nick Thompson
Contact e-mail: baldo@mit.edu, nthomp@mit.edu
Research Area(s): Applied Physics, Energy, Materials and Devices, Nanotechnology
An exciton is an excited state of a molecule. They are important in some solar cells because they mediate the conversion of light into charge. When light is absorbed it forms an exciton, which can later be dissociated into a positive and negative charge. Our particular interest is singlet exciton fission, a poorly-understood process that splits the exciton into two excited states on separate molecules. It is interesting to apply exciton fission to solar cells because it can generate two charges per absorbed photon and thereby break the usual efficiency limits for single junction solar cells. We aim to better understand and exploit this phenomenon. Your project will involve building and characterizing exciton-fission-based organic solar cells. No special training or course background is required.

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