Lynch and team develop 'virtual server' for flexible mobile situations

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December 10, 2010

Collective memory: An MIT project provides a way to preserve information in constantly changing networks, without resorting to a shared serverEECS Professor Nancy Lynch, NEC Professor of Software Science and Engineering in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, CSAIL, and head of the Theory of Distributed Systems group has teamed to develop a virtual network system that acts like a stable network though its data input is gained from mobile devices (or sensors) that are constantly changing, necessitating very different protocols unlike relatively stable networks such as the Internet. [Graphic: Christine Daniloff, MIT News]

As the MIT News Office Dec. 10, 2010 article describes, the project called RAMBO or Reconfigurable Atomic Memory for Basic Objects, was originally designed--at its inception at MIT in 2001--for military applications. Now after presentation in the December issue of the journal Distributed Computing, RAMBO is clearly applicable to other situations 'in the field' such as natural disaster or traffic management where sensor networks, networks of mobile devices, and more are required.

“It’s supposed to look like an instantaneously accessible memory, like if you have one machine in one location,” Lynch described for the MIT News Office. “We wanted to have that same appearance, but really, it’s running on mobile devices out in the field. There is no one machine.”

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MIT News Office, Dec. 10, 2010 by Larry Hardesty "Collective memory: An MIT project provides a way to preserve information in constantly changing networks, without resorting to a shared server"