In the Media

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  • March 22, 2013
    Professor Peter Szolovits has been named the recipient of the 2013 Morris F. Collen Award of Excellence. The award is presented annually by the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) in honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field. According to the ACMI, the award is the "highest honor in informatics that is presented by the American College of Medical Informatics to an individual whose personal commitment and dedication to biomedical informatics has made a lasting impression on healthcare and biomedicine.”
  • February 13, 2013
    Researchers at the High Throughput Neurotechnology Group in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) have built an automated system that can rapidly produce 3-D, micron-resolution images of thousands of zebrafish larvae and precisely analyze their physical traits. The system, described in the Feb. 12 edition of Nature Communications, offers a comprehensive view of how potential drugs affect vertebrates, says Professor Mehmet Fatih Yanik, senior author of the paper.
  • February 11, 2013
    Timothy Lu, MIT assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering working with members of the Synthetic Biology Group in the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), has successfully created new synthetic biology circuits that combine memory and logic allowing potential control over production of cells to generate biofuels, drugs or other useful compounds. Read more...
  • January 25, 2013
    With the fall 2012 launch of the bigdata@csail center, which represents a focused effort to understand and put to good use the huge amounts of data generated all the time, a handful of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT are contributing specifically to medical applications. The MIT News Office has featured the work of Peter Szolovits, John Guttag, Alan Willsky and -- perhaps at the heart of abstractly looking at big data and medicine -- former EECS undergraduate and masters degree student David Rashef, now an MD/PhD student with the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology (HST) program. Read more...
  • December 19, 2012
    With the recent launch of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, the MIT News Office provided an Institute-wide look at the ongoing medical research including the work of Sangeeta Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and of Health Sciences and Technology.
  • November 12, 2012
    Gregory Wornell, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) has teamed with former RLE member Dr. Maryam Shanechi, who has recently earned her doctorate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, Prof. Emery Brown of the Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department at MIT, and neurosurgeon Dr. Ziv Williams at Massachusetts General Hospital to develop the first instance of an "intelligent" Brain-Motor Interface, which uses specially designed advanced neural decoding algorithms to decode in advance a sequence of planned movements from neural activity in the premotor cortex.
  • November 7, 2012
    Anantha Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head, and two of his students in the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) have joined a team of researchers from the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) to show that a natural battery in the mammalian inner ear can power an implantable electronic device. Read more...
  • October 17, 2012
    Calling it a glimpse into the future, technology news website CRN has hailed MIT EECS/CSAIL faculty and the new Wireless@MIT center as the source for seven new technologies that will impact (favorably) our daily lives. Read more...
  • September 18, 2012
    As reported by the Champalimaud Foundation, the 2012 António Champalimaud Vision Award was given to several researchers including Professor James G. Fujimoto, Research Laboratory of Electronics affiliate Eric A. Swanson for the creation and development of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Fujimoto, the Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering, Swanson, and their collaborators were recognized for the major role that OCT now plays in the diagnosis and treatment of the most important blinding diseases of the industrialized world: macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Currently, it is estimated that more than 40 million OCT diagnostic procedures are performed worldwide annually.
  • September 11, 2012
    David Gifford, EECS professor and director of the Computational Genomics Group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), working with members of his group, has developed a new algorithm for analyzing millions of experimentally identified DNA fragments and allowing the inference -- with 55% accuracy in the most difficult cases -- of the precise locations at which transcription factors bind to them. Read more!
  • September 5, 2012
    Manolis Kellis, an associate professor of computer science at MIT and an associate member of the Broad Institute, is one of the lead computational scientists and authors of a paper that describes the functionality of the non-gene regions (about 80 percent) of the human genome, the so-called 'junk DNA'.
  • September 5, 2012
    Polina Golland, associate professor in the MIT EECS department and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), working with EECS graduate student Archana Venkataraman has developed an algorithm which can aid in deciphering what regions of the brain are involved in certain diseases ultimately enabling drug companies to develop more effective treatments for the disease that specifically target these regions.
  • August 15, 2012
    Sangeeta Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a member of the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, has teamed with researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute, to develop an RNA-delivering nanoparticle system that allows clinical targeting to arrive at effective drug treatments.
  • August 3, 2012
    Tim Lu, assistant professor of electrical engineering in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, principal investigator in the Research Lab of Electronics at MIT, and Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has been working with colleagues at Boston University (BU), Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to build genetic circuit components in living cells to ultimately perform novel functions such as manufacturing new drugs, producing fuel, or even programming suicide of cancer cells.
  • July 23, 2012
    Timothy K. Lu, EECS assistant professor and principal investigator with the MIT Research Lab of Electronics, RLE, is one of five MIT members selected for the presidential early career award for Scientists and Engineers - and one of 96 selected for this honor nationwide. Lu is cited for his contributions in establishing innovative synthetic biology platforms and for his pioneering applications of synthetic biology to materials science, nanotechnology and infectious diseases.