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  • November 19, 2014
    A new cybersecurity center made possible by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation will focus on cyber security policy -- one of three new academic initiatives (also at Stanford and UC Berkeley) aimed at laying the foundations for smart, sustainable policy to deal with the growing global cyber threats. Read more.
  • June 2, 2014
    MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) held a two day conference celebrating 50 years of computer science looking forward to the future with solutions for today's obstacles and tomorrow's solutions. Read more.
  • May 14, 2014
    Postdoctoral associate in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Hamed Pirsiavash has developed a new algorithm that offers significant improvements in parsing video — linearly, no matter the length, with fixed requirement for memory and reaching conclusions in search more efficiently. Read more.
  • April 7, 2014
    Imagine being curious enough as an 11 year old — on seeing your babysitter's mysterious calculus textbook symbols — to jump grades in order to leap several years ahead in math? Scott Aaronson, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and affiliate with the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), has always had a way of thinking beyond -- now looking for the truths in computational complexity, and consequently influencing the way computation is perceived and executed in the future. Read more.
  • December 11, 2013
    Professor Piotr Indyk and members of his group in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed an algorithm that betters his (and Prof. Dina Katabi's) work to develop a faster than fast Fourier Transform in 2012. The new algorithm that uses the minimum possible number of samples to analyze signals has the potential to allow advances in medical devices such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machines to scan patients.
  • September 11, 2013
    EECS graduate students Alessandro Chiesa and Madars Virza have teamed to develop a new system which can detect tampering in the cloud. The team presented their system, which is described as a practical, succinct zero-knowledge proof for arbitrary programs, at the International Cryptology Conference in August. Read more
  • August 5, 2013
    CSAIL News: EECS professor Nancy Lynch, who heads the Theory of Distributed Systems Group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and EECS graduate student Moshen Ghaffari, and Cal Newport, a former graduate student in Lynch’s group who’s now an assistant professor of computer science at Georgetown University have used adversarial models in achieving greater network stability for adhoc networks, ie., for wireless device use.
  • June 10, 2013
    EECS faculty members Shafi Goldwasser, and Nickolai Zeldovich, both members of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT, and EECS graduate student Raluca Ada Popa have teamed with colleagues at University of Toronto and Microsoft Research to report a development in the area of homomorphic encryption that offers a functional encryption scheme to maintain security of encrypted data in the cloud.
  • April 9, 2013
    The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has announced that it is honoring Professor Piotr Indyk and Professor Dina Katabi for their innovations in computing technology. Indyk has been named one of the recipients of the Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award, which honors specific theoretical accomplishments that have had a significant and demonstrable effect on the practice of computing. Katabi has been honored as one of the recipients of the Grace Murray Hopper Award, which recognizes the outstanding young computer professionals of the year.
  • March 13, 2013
    MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali have won the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) A.M. Turing Award for their pioneering work in the fields of cryptography and complexity theory. Essentially laying the foundation for modern cryptography by formalizing the concept that cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute, the two have turned cryptography from an art into science -- and, in the process provided the basis for securing today's communications protocols, Internet transactions and cloud computing. They also made fundamental advances in the theory of computational complexity, an area that focuses on classifying computational problems according to their inherent difficulty.
  • February 16, 2013
    In a paper titled "Ampli fication of Chosen-Ciphertext Security," two CSAIL postdoctoral associates Huijia (Rachel) Lin and Stefano Tessaro, who work with EECS Professor Shafi Goldwasser, have proposed a new technique aimed at protecting against the worst possible scenario in current enryption scheme vulnerabilities. This work will be presented in May this spring at the International Conference on the Theory and Applications of Cryptographic Techniques.
  • February 1, 2013
    Trying to build a new circuit that would use an emerging technology called compressed sensing has taken on a renewed focus under the work of members of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT including EECS graduate student Omid Abari. With researchers in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE) and in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) Obari is seeking to balance theory with chip building realities using new evaluation algorithms to allow creation of the ideal circuit.
  • January 18, 2013
    In March 2011, Scott Aaronson, MIT associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS) and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) working with EECS graduate student Alex Arkhipov proposed the creation of a first step towards quantum computing -- an optical experiment that would demonstrate the feasibility of quantum computing. Four distinct research groups, which undertook Aaronson and Arkhipov's proposed experiment in December 2012, are now reporting the results.
  • December 3, 2012
    EECS faculty member Erik Demaine, professor of computer science at MIT, and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with members of the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms to develop a new kind of robotic device that mimics nature's folding of proteins to allow for all kinds of possible functionality.
  • November 13, 2012
    In the effort to handle data overload, Daniela Rus, professor of computer science MIT and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has teamed with postdoctoral associate Daniel Feldman to describe a novel way to represent data so that it takes up much less space in memory but can still be processed in conventional ways when needed.
  • November 13, 2012
    Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston, who earned his undergraduate degree in computer science at MIT in 2005 and teamed with then EECS undergraduate student Arash Ferdowsi to found the company, will be the MIT June 7, 2013 Commencement speaker. "I’ve had some of the most formative experiences of my life at MIT,” Houston says. “It’s where Dropbox started and where I met my co-founder, Arash, so it’s an honor to come back and share my story. Technology is at the heart of how we shape our future and confront our challenges, and more than ever the world needs MIT graduates to lead us forward.”
  • July 24, 2012
    Shafi Goldwasser, the RSA professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT and principal investigator with the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, is among three at MIT selected as Simons Investigator by the Simons Foundation.
  • July 11, 2012
    Professor of applied math and computer science at MIT and head of the Computation and Biology Group, Bonnie Berger, with former and current students, has developed an algorithm that allows researchers to access huge amounts of data in geneome databases despite the rate of genome sequencing that threatens to outpace researchers' ability to analyze the added data.
  • June 26, 2012
    Daskalakis, students use game theory to tackle 30 year economics problem - extending Nobel winner’s work on single-item auctions to auctions involving multiple items.
  • May 31, 2012
    At a major Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence event held May 31, 2012 at the MIT Stata Center, a new CSAIL initiative known as "bigdata@CSAIL" was announced by MIT president Susan Hockfield as Intel’s CTO, Justin Rattner announced that MIT would house a new Intel research center to focus on techniques for the science and engineering of big data -- the huge amounts of information generated by Web users and networked sensors. In addition, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick announced the Massachusetts Big Data Initiative to investigate how big-data technologies can improve government.
  • May 29, 2012
    Indyk/Katabi's sparse Fourier transform (SFT) has been named to MIT Technology Review’s 2012 list of the world’s 10 most important emerging technologies.
  • May 1, 2012
    Shafi Goldwasser and former graduate student Guy Rosenblum, who is now at Microsoft Research, have conducted a ten year foundational study on computer security that focuses on side-channel attacks, the latest and greatest threat to security as cloud computing becomes the new standard.
  • April 25, 2012
    At the Association for Computing Machinery’s Symposium on Theory of Computing in May, Silvio Micali, and graduate student Pablo Azar will present a new type of mathematical game that they’re calling a rational proof.
  • March 9, 2012
    The National Science Foundation (NSF) named Scott Aaronson of MIT as one of two recipients of this year’s Alan T. Waterman Award. The honor goes to an outstanding researcher under the age of 35 in any field of science or engineering that is supported by the NSF.
  • January 18, 2012
    EECS faculty members Dina Katabi and Piotr Indyk with graduate students Eric Price and Haitham Hassanieh will present a new algorithm this week at the Association for Computing Machinery’s Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA) that, for a large range of practically important cases, improves on the fast Fourier transform -- in some cases yielding a tenfold increase in speed.