• As MIT launches into the construction of a new nano center in the heart of its campus (becoming the new building 12), the plans for this exciting new center and the people who will lead these efforts are highlighted in several MIT News Office articles including a video featuring Vladimir Bulovic, Associate Dean for Innovation, and Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Professor of Emerging Technology. Read more.
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, professor in the MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and head of the Analog Circuits and Biological Systems Group in MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) is featured by the Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) at MIT for his work that blends both biological (wet) and electronic analog circuits (dry) in research that could lead to newly engineered immune cells that could detect cancer cells and kill them, for example. Read more.
  • Prof. Steven B. Leeb met with Sharon Burke, assistant secretary of Defense for Operational Energy Plans and Programs, about the non-intrusive load monitor developed at MIT, during Burke's visit to the Army Base Camp Integration Laboratory at Fort Devens, Mass. The monitor can look at an energy grid and break down energy use by individual devices plugged into a system. Read more.
  • Muriel Médard, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the MIT EECS Department and principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT, has been awarded, with co-authors Josu Bilbao, Aitor Calvo, Igor Armendariz, and Pedro Crespo, the Best Paper Award for their work “Reliable Communications with Network coding in narrowband Powerline Channel.” They presented this work at the IEEE International Symposium on Power Line Communications and its Applications (ISPLC 2014) in Glasgow in March. Read more.
  • Robert D. Blumofe and Charles E. Leiserson were announced today as the winners of the 2013 Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award for contributions to robust parallel and distributed computing. The ACM credits Blumofe and Leiserson for developing provably efficient randomized “work-stealing” scheduling algorithms and Cilk, a small but powerful programming-language extension for multithreaded computing. The Kanellakis Award honors specific theoretical accomplishments that significantly affect the practice of computing. Read more.
  • Until now the theoretical and much studied quasiparticle known as the exciton — responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits — has never been observed in action. Now researchers in the Center for EXcitonics in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT including EECS professors Marc Baldo and Vladimir Bulovic, and investigators at the City College of New York have imaged excitons' motions directly. Read more.
  • Twenty-seven Start6 students traveled to Northern California over spring break to visit start-ups, meet alumni, and engage with and present to venture capital firms in the SF area. Their trip included tours and tech talks at DropBox, Lemnos Labs, Quizlet, Meraki, Cisco, FireEye, and Pinterest, as well as a pitch session at Andreessen Horowitz (A16Z), a Menlo Park venture capital firm. Read more.
  • As the director of MIT’s BigData@CSAIL industry initiative, and the co-director of the more research-focused Intel Science and Technology Center (ISTC) for Big Data, EECS professor and CSAIL principal investigator Sam Madden talks with the MIT News Office about the growing complexity of data. From social networks and images to real time financial transactions, Madden talks about the issues (and opportunities) of what to do with this data. Read more.
  • Imagine being curious enough as an 11 year old — on seeing your babysitter's mysterious calculus textbook symbols — to jump grades in order to leap several years ahead in math? Scott Aaronson, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and affiliate with the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), has always had a way of thinking beyond -- now looking for the truths in computational complexity, and consequently influencing the way computation is perceived and executed in the future. Read more.
  • Dina Katabi has been selected for the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. In announcing this appointment, Department Head Anantha Chandraksan shared the following message with his colleagues in the EECS Department. Read more.