• This week, at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE's) International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), the group of Anantha Chandrakasan, EECS Department Head and the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor in Electrical Engineering at MIT, will present a new transmitter design that reduces power leakage when transmitters are idle — greatly extending battery life and ultimately enabling the potential for the transmission of data needed for the "Internet of things". Read more.
  • Yoel Fink, Director of MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics and professor of materials science and electrical engineering and computer sicence has teamed to develop multifunctional fibers made from abundant, low cost aluminum metal and silica glass. Read more.
  • Mapping the human genome, accomplished a decade ago, was heralded for laying the foundation for understanding genetic variation and links to a wide range of diseases. But genes can be switched on and off by many chemical modifications, aka "epigenetic marks." Now Manolis Kellis, EECS professor and member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab and the Broad Institute has led an NIH group that has created a similar map of the human epigenome. This work will lead to a global map towards understanding fundamental developmental and disease processes in humans. Read more.
  • Our susceptibility to disease depends both on the genes that we inherit from our parents and on our lifetime experiences. These two components — nature and nurture — seem to affect very different processes in the context of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published today in the journal Nature. Read more.
  • In the quest for improving the speed and efficiency of multicore chips, EECS Assistant Professor Daniel Sanchez and graduate student Nathan Beckmann designed a system that moves data around multicore chips' memory banks — improving execution by 18 percent on average while increasing energy efficiency as well. They won an award for this work in 2013. Now.. Read more.
  • Kateeva, a company co-founded by EECS graduate Conor Madigan SM ’02 PhD ’06, now CEO and Vladimir Bulovic, the Fariborz Maseeh Professor of Emerging Technology in EECS and co-founder and now scientific advisor is featured by the MIT News for its promising technologies to mass produce large-screen, flexible OLED. Read more.
  • Professor Rob Miller and members of the User Interface Design Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have devised a system that uses crowd-sourcing to annotate instructional videos for improved learning. Read more.
  • Jack Ruina, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1963 to 1997 and emeritus thereafter, died on Feb. 4 at the age of 91. Read more.
  • Start6 classes are over, but it is still well remembered by all involved and present — including Dennis Keohane, tech writer for the Boston Globe's Beta Boston. Keohane took in most of the classes for two weeks and a day with full opportunity to talk with the speakers and students and visitors. Read more.
  • In 2008, the World Health Organization announced a global effort to eradicate malaria, which kills about 800,000 people every year. As part of that goal, scientists are trying to develop new drugs that target the malaria parasite during the stage when it infects the human liver — crucial because some strains of malaria can lie dormant in the liver for several years before flaring up. Read more.