• Cited for her work as doctor, engineer and scientist to design nano and micro technologies that pioneer new ways to understand and fight disease, Sangeeta N. Bhatia, the John J. (1929) and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) has been awarded the Lemelson-MIT Prize. Read more.
  • “If you want to understand bank runs in financial systems, or congestion in the air transportation system, you have to understand the interaction between social and institutional behavior, and physical and engineered systems,” Professor Munther Dahleh says. “This means integrating education and research across campus, including the business school, humanities and social sciences, sciences, and engineering.” Read more.
  • Start6 is coming in IAP -- will you be there? Sign up soon (by Nov. 17) at start6.eecs.mit.edu and stay tuned for more details.
  • A research team from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology including Jongyoon Han, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, has developed a new way to diagnose malaria using magnetic resonance relaxometry (MRR) — a technology that the group is adapting for inexpensive field deployable usage. Read more.
  • Professor Ruonan Han joined the EECS department at MIT as an assistant professor in July 2014. As a principal investigator with the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL), Han will pursue work in ultra-high-speed circuits and systems. His research group, the Terahertz Integrated Electronics Group aims to explore microelectronic technologies to bridge the terahertz gap between microwave and infrared domains. Read more.
  • Two graduate students working with Hari Balkrishnan, the Fujitsu Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, proposed in 2012 a classroom contest challenge in a graduate-level networking course to design protocols for managing congestion in cellular networks. The prize? Coauthorship of a paper describing the contest and its results in the ACM SIGCOMM Computer Communication Review. The winners? Four undergraduates, João Batalha ’13, Ameesh Goyal ’14, Somak Das ’14, and Joshua Ma ’14, and the two graduate students, Keith Winstein, now assistant professor at Stanford University and Anirudh Sivaraman. Read more!
  • Getting to the source of data-visualization aberrations is a big problem in big data. EECS doctoral student Eugene Wu with Sam Madden, professor of computer science and engineering in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have released a new tool, called DBWipes, that pinpoints aberrations and determines which data sources to investigate. Read more.
  • David Perreault is professor of electrical engineering, associate EECS Department head and head of the Power Electronics Research Group and he and his group have been and are focused on efficiency — how to improve power conversion in the face of an 80 percent rise in demand through 2030. Read more.
  • A team led by Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) researchers including EECS associate professor Wojciech Matusik and project lead and doctoral candidate Adriana Schulz has developed “Fab By Example,” the first data-driven method to help people design products, with a growing database of templates that allow users to customize thousands of complex items — without the need to understand the mechanical engineering that might normally be expected. The team will be presenting its system at this month’s Siggraph graphics conference. Read more.
  • Daniella Rus, Director of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and CSAIL colleague Erik Demaine with researchers from Harvard have designed foldable robots with embedded circuitry to allow for stepwise configuration. Their work appeared in the Aug. 7th issue of Science. Read more.